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A Regent alumna: Explore Regent's APA-accredited Psy.D. program.

Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology

Understand Human Problems. Promote Change Through Regent’s APA-Accredited Psy.D. Program.

Complex human problems don’t have to go unresolved. By understanding and applying the science of psychology, you can promote resilience and strength. Regent’s APA-accredited Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) in Clinical Psychology, offered on campus, will equip you with clinical skills — the practical application of theory and therapeutic techniques — to assess and treat mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders. This terminal degree prepares you for state licensure as a clinical psychologist. You’ll also prepare for national internships.

On Campus
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August 23, 2021
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Advance Your Career

This versatile clinical psychology degree positions you for tremendous societal impact and earning potential.

Gain Thorough Hands-On Experience

Integrate a Christian worldview and cultural understandings in evidence-based clinical practice and research. Our Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology students have earned a 100 percent internship match-rate for four consecutive years (2016-2020). In 2017, 2019, and 2020, all the matches were with APA-accredited sites. 

Be Mentored by Leaders IN THE PSY.D. PROGRAM

Work closely with respected psychology faculty and clinical supervisors committed to developing you as a clinician and professional. Presented with Christian Psy.D. program perspectives on campus in Virginia Beach, this program can be completed in four years, followed by a one-year approved internship.

Pursue Academic Excellence

Regent has been ranked among top national universities by U.S. News & World Report in 2019 and 2020. Our Psy.D. program is structured to allow students who have earned their bachelor’s to combine their master’s and doctoral degrees. Experience the Regent difference.

Student Admissions, Outcomes, and Other Data >

To learn more about this program, please complete the Request Information form on this page.

Through this APA-accredited Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology degree program, you will:

  • Engage with and be mentored by leading faculty.
  • Learn both the scientific and professional discipline of clinical psychology.
  • Receive exemplary training to enter the workforce as a local clinical scientist.
  • Adapt your training to meet the licensing requirements of your state and jurisdiction.

Career Opportunities

  • Licensed Clinical Psychologist
  • Psychiatric Hospital Staff
  • Private Practitioner
  • Professor
  • Director of Christian Counseling Center
  • Business/Industry Consultant
  • Board Member/Director of Human Services Agencies
  • Church/School Consultant
$87Thousand
Approximate mean annual wage for Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2019

Familiarizes the student with field of professional psychology, including its history. Provides a graduate survey of the development of various training models for professional psychology, ethical issues, licensing laws and specialties within clinical psychology. Attention to the application of scientific thinking and research to clinical issues. Provides a survey of diverse approaches to integration of faith and psychology.

A survey of evidence based procedures for the assessment and treatment of child psychopathology including such disorders as AD/HD and Autism. The course also introduces the student to the field of pediatric psychology with its emphasis on the treatment of children in health settings.

Learn how to critically evaluate and use research designs such as experimental, quasi-experimental and passive-observational designs. Explores other pertinent issues such as sampling, meta-analysis techniques, ethics of research and qualitative research strategies. Present critiques of published research papers. Prerequisite or concurrent: PSY 714.

Covers training in basic listening skills related to the establishment and maintenance of a therapeutic relationship. Client-centered techniques and interventions are presented to provide a foundational basis for the building of rapport and of a therapeutic alliance.

This pre-practica training course utilizes observation and skill rehearsal to teach students evidence based practice. Students spend time observing psychotherapy and assessment cases, evaluating exemplar video production cases of psychotherapy treatment, and developing assessment and intervention skills. Prerequisites: PSY 621, PSY 638, and PSY 725.

Focused survey of two psychotherapy orientations: cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy and behavioral therapy. Learn how to conceptualize a clinical case from each perspective, formulate theoretically consistent treatment goals and move the treatment through each of the phases of therapy using interventions from the approach. Provides an example of an empirically supported treatment protocol utilizing each therapeutic orientation. Presented in a modular fashion, divided into distinct segments focusing on each approach.

Intensive introduction to the basic concepts, techniques and strategies associated with psycho-dynamic therapies. Provides an overview of objective relations therapy to enrich appreciation of psycho-analysis. Devoted to the presentation of single cases. Prerequisite: PSY 627.

Examination of abnormal behavior as defined by DSM. Includes an introduction to the etiology, diagnosis, treatment and spiritual dimension of these disorders. Designed to develop clinical skills in the use of the DSM.

Study of the processes of human growth and developing patterns of behavior throughout the life span. Particular emphasis on the physical, mental, emotional, intellectual and spiritual growth of the individual.

In-depth concepts of ethical, legal, moral and spiritual issues in therapy. Case studies often form a basis for discussion. Explores the APA ethics standards.

Didactic and experiential course to expand personal and professional relationship competencies in working with people in our contemporary, pluralistic society. Explores religion as an aspect of diversity.

Intensive coverage of current topics in the clinical psychology field with emphasis on the appropriate research methodology and design. Evaluates the philosophy and ethics of scientific research. Determine research for doctoral project and to develop a concept paper around the particular topic. Pass/No Pass.

Credits given for conducting research under the direction of a dissertation committee. Content of the study can be an empirical study, case study or other suitable professional activity/product. Register for three consecutive terms, at 3 credits per term. Prerequisite: PSY 718. Pass/No Pass.

Statistical methods and application to psychological research. Surveys the collection, organization and analysis of data utilizing hypothesis testing by either parametric or nonparametric techniques. Evaluates various frequency distributions and measures of central tendency. Emphasizes the application of correlational and factor analysis techniques.

Technology requirements: Students need to have access to a laptop computer that can install SPSS program for their Statistics (PSY714) and Research Design (PSY617) courses. Students can rent or purchase the SPSS program. Note that SPSS cannot be installed on a tablet, Chromebook, or similar device. Classroom assignments and exams will utilize SPSS within the class. More information about the SPSS program and system requirements can be found at: https://www.ibm.com/us-en/marketplace/spss-statistics-gradpack

Structure and function of the central nervous system is integrated with common neurological disorders such as closed head injury, Parkinson’s disease and stroke. Explores seminal work done by early physiological psychologists.

Topics include animal and human emotions and their interface with biology and social and cultural variation. Specific cognitive activities including attention and perception, consciousness, thinking and reasoning, memory and speech and languages are evaluated within a motivational framework.

Overview of the major theories, issues, data and research methodologies of social psychology. Cover a broad survey of primary research writings in the field.

Develop a proposal for a doctoral project with supervision by a faculty member. Prepare internship application materials and explore the future internship as a professional developmental stage. Prerequisite: PSY 700. Pass/No Pass.

Traces the emergence of psychology as an independent discipline from its roots in philosophy, theology and the natural sciences.

Introduces the diverse area of intelligence testing, with particular emphasis on multicultural dimensions of the topic. Administer, score and evaluate the findings of standard intelligence and achievement tests. Primary emphasis on current versions of the Wechsler scales. Examine brief IQ tests and brief neuropsychiatric screening instruments. Use your experiences with each of the above tests to explore the critical area of psychometrics found in all psychological testing.

Covers standard objective and performance based tests of personality and psychopathology. Tests covered include the current versions of the MMPI, PAI, MCMI, Rorschach (introductory material only), TAT, and other projective techniques. Learn to integrate findings into a comprehensive, domain focused testing report.

Surveys areas of practical, applied, biopsychosocial, evidence-based psychological assessments with a focus on clinical practice applications. Trains to interpret a variety of testing instruments to further equip students for practice in a variety of evaluation and treatment settings. Pass/No Pass.

Introduction to psychodiagnostic assessment and treatment planning. Covers a variety of related topics including: diagnostic interviewing/decision making, case conceptualization, mental status exams, standards of practice, establishing appropriate treatment plans and using manualized treatment protocols. Reviews methods of note-taking and report-writing.

Supervised clinical practicum experience in an appropriate work environment for six terms. Learn how to integrate your Christian worldview and practice with the theory and practice of psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 622. Pass/No Pass.

Incorporates advanced clinical experiences designed, arranged, implemented and conducted by doctoral students under faculty supervision. Prerequisites: PSY 733-738. Pass/No Pass.

Incorporates advanced clinical experiences designed, arranged, implemented and conducted by doctoral students under faculty supervision. Prerequisites: PSY 733-738 and PSY 763. Pass/No Pass.

Explores the major models of supervision. Discussion of ethical issues, as well as typical dilemmas for the practicing supervisor. Evaluates consultations with other professionals and organizations. Provides peer supervision and completion of a consultation project.

Covers the settings in which health psychology and integrated medicine are practiced, and health promotion and epidemiology. Introduces the relationship between psychological factors and medical illnesses, stress management and coping strategies and methods of consultation in health settings.

Analyzes and evaluates the contributions of psychology to the understanding of religious experience. Surveys the theory and research of the field of psychology of religion, and reviews the spectrum of major world religions. Cross-listed with GPSY 552.

Overview of several key aspects of the Christian faith that are highly pertinent to the task of integration. Pursues a broad survey of Christianity that is trans-sectarian but evangelical in perspective. Provides a panoramic survey of the Bible, church history, theology and Christian movements, and a more focused discussion of the statement of faith ascribed to by Regent University faculty and staff. Two broad themes underlie the course: 1) providing an apologetic understanding of Christianity; and 2) facilitating a Christian understanding of human nature that can inform psychology. Cross-listed with HSC 577 and PAC 577.

Applied formational approach to the Christian faith via the developing traditions of spiritual direction and the classic spiritual disciplines, and how the synthesis of spiritual direction and disciplines may be integrated into therapeutic processes. Pass/No Pass.

Examines clinical integration within a Christian worldview and explores examples of applied integrative theory and practice in assessment and treatment.

Intensive seminar that provides a culminating review of the student’s developing strategies, experiences and understandings related to the integration of Christianity and psychology. Occurs during the last term of coursework prior to the internship. Pass/No Pass.

Two thousand hours of supervised psychological activities in an APA-approved internship. Prerequisite: permission of clinical training director. Pass/No Pass.

Application Deadline:

Fall:

  • November 15, 2020 – Priority Deadline – You will be afforded a quicker review by faculty and priority choice of your preferred interview date if offered an invitation for January interviews.
  • December 15, 2020 – Application and all required materials must be submitted by this date.

Virtual Interview Dates: Friday, January 29, 2021 – Saturday, January 30, 2021

Prerequisites:

Psy.D. applicants must:

  • Hold a B.A. or B.S. from a regionally accredited college or university. Acceptable degrees include those in counseling, psychology or related human behavioral fields. If your degree is in a different discipline, a minimum of 18 semester hours in psychology coursework is required. The following courses are recommended: Introduction to Psychology, Psychological Statistics/Research Methods, Personality Theory, Human Development, Abnormal Psychology, Psychological Tests & Measurements, Social Psychology and Physiological Psychology.
  • Have a minimum of a 3.0 GPA for all undergraduate coursework or 3.5 GPA in all master’s level coursework. Average undergrad GPA of admitted students: 3.57 (average for last three years).

Admissions Process:

Step 1: Application
Submit your application using our Regent University Online Application.

Step 2: Complete Your Academic Background Questionnaire
In lieu of the previously required personal goal statement, please complete a brief admissions questionnaire based on your professional goals and interests. This should only take a few minutes to complete but please answer the questions completely and thoughtfully. This enables you to demonstrate your interest in clinical psychology with a particular emphasis on practice. The admissions questionnaire can be found here. Once completed, it will be sent directly to an admissions counselor who will be in touch with you right away to help complete the rest of your application.

Step 3: Resume or CV
Submit a resume or curriculum vita. Please email to your admissions counselor at apply@regent.edu using the subject line: SPC Doctoral Application Pieces.

Step 4: Unofficial Transcripts
We are able to examine and view your unofficial transcripts from U.S.-based schools, which indicate successful completion of bachelor’s and master’s degree programs, in order to review you for an admissions decision. Please submit your unofficial transcript to our Admissions Office by email to apply@regent.edu using the subject line: SPC Doctoral Application Pieces.

Non-U.S. transcripts must be evaluated by an NACES-approved company. For further details, please review the International Admissions Checklist on the International Students Admissions page.

International Applicants: Please visit the International Students Admissions page for a more detailed explanation of the Regent University application information and to determine whether or not you qualify as an international student.

*Upon conditional acceptance to the program by review of unofficial transcripts, Regent University’s Admissions Office will attempt to obtain your official transcripts from your U.S. degree-granting institutions, which indicate successful completion of bachelor’s and master’s degree programs. We will notify you if your previous institutions will not release transcripts directly to us.

Step 5: GRE Scores
Submit official GRE scores. The GRE requirement cannot be waived. The School of Psychology & Counseling does not require the Psychology Subject Test. The writing portion of the general test is used for placement purposes. A score of 3.5 or above will exempt admitted students from having to complete the university writing course. Average GRE of admitted students: 156 Verbal and 151 Quantitative (revised score scale). These are averages based on the scores of enrolled students over the last three years.

Historically, the Psy.D. program has admitted students with GRE scores ranging from 141-164 Quantitative and 150-170 Verbal using a number of academic, experiential and interpersonal factors to determine admissibility.

For more information about the GRE you can contact:

GRE: Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ 08541, 609-771-7670 / 866-473-4373, www.ets.org/gre/

Step 6: Recommendation Letters
Use the Recommendation Request Form to submit all three recommendations below. These recommendations may not be completed by family members. Recommendations received from family members will be rejected and the applicant will be required to submit a new recommendation request for a non-family member.

  1. Clergy Recommendation – This recommendation should be completed by someone who has the ability to evaluate your spiritual maturity and understands your spiritual goals and objectives, such as a pastor, priest, rabbi, or, other religious/moral leader.
  2. Faculty Recommendation – This recommendation should be completed by a former professor or instructor capable of evaluating your academic preparation for the type of degree you seek to complete. If it has been more than five years since your last schooling, a supervisor recommendation may be submitted in lieu of the faculty recommendation. You are welcome to submit more than one faculty recommendation, but please consider selecting professors who can address different aspects of your academic abilities.
  3. Employer/Professional Associate Recommendation – This recommendation should be completed by an employer or professional associate, or you may use an additional faculty reference.

Step 7: Government-Issued ID
To ensure academic integrity, Regent University requires a copy of a government-issued ID. Please email a scanned copy or photograph of it to apply@regent.edu with the subject line: Government ID.

Step 8: Interview
Interviews for the Psy.D. program are by invitation only after review of the completed application. Interviews include both a group interview and a personal interview with our faculty. These interviews will take place in person on our campus in Virginia Beach on designated dates, usually in February. Participation in this interview process is expected, and applicants will bear any travel expenses. Additional details will be provided to those invited for an interview.

Applicants invited to the interview should keep in mind that an interview does not assure admission. We use a “whole person” review philosophy in making admissions decisions. No one area, either strength or weakness, is something that would cause an applicant to be admitted or denied. However, applicants should know that those with lower than a 3.0 undergraduate GPA or 152 GRE-Verbal score or 144 GRE-Quantitative would be unlikely to be admitted into the program without some very unusual demonstration of abilities to compensate.

International student applicants should allow at least 4-6 weeks for an admission decision to be made once the applicant has submitted all required documents to the appropriate offices and has followed all processes and procedures required for an admission decision.

Please feel free to contact the Office of Admissions at 757.352.4498 or psycounadmissions@regent.edu should you have any further questions about the application process.


Note: All items submitted as part of the application process become the property of Regent University and cannot be returned.

PART-TIME STUDENTS

DegreeTuition Cost Per Credit HourAverage Credit Hours Per SemesterAverage Tuition Per Semester
Master of Arts in Human Services (MA)$5956$3,570
Master of Arts in Pastoral Counseling (MA)$5956$3,570
Master of Science in Psychology (MS)$6756$4,050
Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (MA)$7106$4,260
Master of Arts in School Counseling (MA)$7106$4,260
Master of Arts in Marriage, Couple & Family Counseling (MA)$7106$4,260
Doctor of Philosophy in Counseling & Psychological Studies (PhD)$6753$2,025
Doctor of Philosophy in Counselor Education & Supervision (PhD)$8753$2,625
Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (PsyD)Full time enrollment is required.

Full-Time Students

DegreeTuition Cost Per Credit HourAverage Credit Hours Per SemesterAverage Tuition Per Semester
Master of Arts in Human Services (MA)$5959$5,355
Master of Arts in Pastoral Counseling (MA)$5959$5,355
Master of Science in Psychology (MS)$6759$6,075
Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (MA)$7109$6,390
Master of Arts in School Counseling (MA)$7109$6,390
Master of Arts in Marriage, Couple & Family Counseling (MA)$7109$6,390
Doctor of Philosophy in Counseling & Psychological Studies (PhD)$6756$4,050
Doctor of Philosophy in Counselor Education & Supervision (PhD)$8756$5,250
Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (PsyD)$87512$10,500

Student Fees Per Semester

University Services Fee (On-Campus Students)$800
University Services Fee (Online Students)$650

Part-Time Students

DegreeTuition Cost Per Credit HourAverage Credit Hours Per SemesterAverage Tuition Per Semester
Master of Arts in Human Services (MA)$5956$3,570
Master of Arts in Pastoral Counseling (MA)$5956$3,570
Master of Science in Psychology (MS)$6756$4,050
Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (MA)$7106$4,260
Master of Arts in School Counseling (MA)$7106$4,260
Master of Arts in Marriage, Couple & Family Counseling (MA)$7106$4,260
Doctor of Philosophy in Counseling & Psychological Studies (PhD)$6753$2,025
Doctor of Philosophy in Counselor Education & Supervision (PhD)$8753$2,625
Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (PsyD)Full time enrollment is required.

Full-Time Students

DegreeTuition Cost Per Credit HourAverage Credit Hours Per SemesterAverage Tuition Per Semester
Master of Arts in Human Services (MA)$5959$5,355
Master of Arts in Pastoral Counseling (MA)$5959$5,355
Master of Science in Psychology (MS)$6759$6,075
Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (MA)$7109$6,390
Master of Arts in School Counseling (MA)$7109$6,390
Master of Arts in Marriage, Couple & Family Counseling (MA)$7109$6,390
Doctor of Philosophy in Counseling & Psychological Studies (PhD)$6756$4,050
Doctor of Philosophy in Counselor Education & Supervision (PhD)$8756$5,250
Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (PsyD)$87512$10,500

Student Fees Per Semester

University Services Fee (On-Campus Students)$750
University Services Fee (Online Students)$600

*Rates are subject to change at any time.

Estimated Cost of Attendance: View the estimated cost of attendance to see an example of the total cost of tuition and fees.

Psy.D. Specific Scholarships: The School of Psychology & Counseling offers a variety of Psy.D. specific scholarships: Academic Merit Scholarship, Teaching Assistantships, Minority Student Merit Scholarship, First Generation Merit Scholarship and Christian Leadership Scholarship.

Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology (Psy.D.) 

What is a Psy.D.?

The Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) degree is designed to be responsive to society’s need for psychologists functioning in a variety of leadership roles. The program promotes well-being and the alleviation of suffering from the unique professional and scientific identity of clinical psychology. The mission of the Regent Psy.D. program is to:

  • Educate doctoral students in a broad and general clinical practitioner scholar model, to obtain careers in health services psychology.
  • Educate students in the integration of psychology and Christian worldview

The APA-accredited Psy.D. program combines scholarship with intensive practitioner training that prepares graduates to provide scientifically informed servant leadership in their communities of practice. The Psy.D. is designed to provide students with a broad training in psychological practice. Students also have opportunities to pursue elective concentrations in specialty areas such as clinical child psychology, marriage and family therapy, health psychology, forensic psychology, and consulting psychology. The program has an integrative approach: integration of clinical work and coursework, integration of faith and practice, and integration of multicultural, ethical and diversity issues in both didactics and practice.

As an APA-accredited doctoral program in clinical psychology, Regent’s Psy.D. is designed to fulfill the typical training program requirements for licensure as a psychologist in various U.S. and Canadian jurisdictions.

How long does it take to get a Psy.D.?

Regent’s Psy.D. program is a five-year, full-time course of study consisting of 124 semester hours beyond the bachelor’s degree. It culminates in a 2,000-hour internship and dissertation project. Admission into the Psy.D. program is limited to the fall semester, due to carefully planned fixed-course progression and clinical training sequence.

Do I need to have a master’s degree to apply for the Psy.D. program?

Actually, most of the students enrolled in the Psy.D. program do not hold master’s degrees. Regent’s Psy.D. program is structured to allow you to combine your master’s and doctoral degrees. The admission requirement is a completed four-year bachelor’s degree from a post-secondary institution with state and regional accreditation.

If I have an M.A. in Counseling, may I skip some of the coursework and shorten the program?

While a student with a master’s in a mental health field (i.e., clinical or counseling psychology, counseling, social work) may generally be able to get the equivalent of about one year of credits waived, we discourage shortening the duration of the program. For instance, the clinical training sequence is required for all students regardless of prior training. That sequence is set up over five years and to shorten the program requires third and fourth-year clinical training activities be done concurrently, which is not ideal. A better option is for students to take the five years to complete the program, but to take lighter semesters or pursue more elective work. This will enhance their training experience. All students not already holding a master’s degree in clinical psychology, earn the master’s as part of their doctoral training sequence. The other issue to remember is that if your master’s is not in clinical psychology, your training at Regent will be also aimed at helping you reorient to a clinical psychology perspective on courses that you have already completed in a related discipline.

May I transfer credits from a master’s program into the Psy.D. degree?

You may transfer up to 25 percent of our program’s credit hours as long as the credits have not been used to complete a degree and are similar at least 75 percent with our courses.

Some courses from a completed degree can be used to waive certain courses in our program. Courses that are not transferable or that cannot be waived would be any type of clinically-focused course (e.g., practicum, therapeutic skills, etc.), and some required program didactic courses.

Is the GRE required if I already have a master’s degree or am enrolled in a master’s program?

Yes, we cannot waive the GRE requirement under any circumstances for our doctoral programs.

Am I eligible to receive a nested Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology?

Students who have completed 64 credit hours toward the Psy.D. and the full PSY 733-735 Practica course series are eligible to receive a nested Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology. Students must complete and submit the Graduation Application found on the Registrar’s Office web page and pay the appropriate graduation fee in order to obtain the degree. Application for the M.A. is required as a condition of doctoral candidacy unless a student petitions for exemption based on having already obtained an M.A. in Clinical or Professional Psychology elsewhere.

Am I required to attend full time, or may I go at my own pace?

The program is set up in a cohort model and requires that you attend full time in a fixed-course progression. During the fall and spring terms, the course load is 12 credit hours; and in the summer term, the course load is nine credit hours. Therefore, you would be enrolled in classes year-round for four years with a full-time internship in the final year.

How many hours do you recommend a Psy.D. student work per week?

Due to the number of hours you will be spending in and out of class studying, we suggest you work no more than 20 hours per week. There are a number of part-time graduate assistant positions available every semester at Regent that allow for flexible schedules.

I didn’t major in psychology at the undergraduate level, so what do I need to do to make up for this?

Admission requires 18 credit hours in undergraduate psychology, so you would need to make up any credit hours that fall short of that.

Are there any technology requirements?

Students need to have access to a laptop computer that can install SPSS program for their Statistics (PSY714) and Research Design (PSY617) courses. Students can rent or purchase the SPSS program. Note that SPSS cannot be installed on a tablet, Chromebook, or similar device. Classroom assignments and exams will utilize SPSS within the class. More information about the SPSS program and system requirements can be found at: https://www.ibm.com/us-en/marketplace/spss-statistics-gradpack

How many applicants do you have each year and how many are admitted?

Annually, we admit and enroll 23 students into the new cohort from a group of about 100 applications.

What is the average age of the students?

The average age is 26.

What is the path for licensure for graduates from your program?

Licensure is different in each state. However, the general standard for licensure is the completion of a doctorate, including the full-time, fifth-year internship, a year of residency, and state and national licensure exams, which are taken after graduating with the doctorate. Residency can vary widely in different states. Students should examine the requirements for licensure in the state or states where they would like to practice in the future.

What types of clinical or practical training experiences do students gain in your program?

The clinical training sequence is a planned course of study incorporating instructive and supervised experiential training. The first two years of training occur on campus often in our Psychological Services Center. During the third and fourth year, students are typically placed off campus in a community setting. Practica training is facilitated by intensive supervision provided at training sites combined with secondary practica seminars instructed by Regent faculty. Because of the practitioner-scholar model adopted by the doctoral program, a substantial amount of the student’s time will be spent applying/refining psychological knowledge and skills in clinical contexts.

What are some of the career options for graduates of your program?

Typically, clinical psychologists work in one of five settings after graduation: colleges and universities as professors; mental health centers as administrators, conducting assessments, diagnosis and treatment (psychotherapy); medical hospitals as consultants or liaisons to medical professionals, as well as performing similar duties to those at mental health centers; psychiatric hospitals; private practice. A survey conducted by Norcross, Krag and Prochaska (1997) found that 15 percent of clinical psychologists were employed in academic settings, 30 percent in hospitals or clinics, and 40 percent in private practice.

Accreditation

The Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation (CoA) of the American Psychological Association (APA). Contact the APA at Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation, 750 First Street, NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242 or 202.336.5979.

Combined Master's-Doctoral Program
Preparation for State Licensure

“If you are focused, determined, willing to put in the work and make sacrifices, anyone can do this. I give all praise to God. Keep going no matter what.”

Antonio Tuck, M.A. in Counseling, 2020 Human Services Professional

“I am extremely grateful for the excellent education that Regent provides through the School of Psychology & Counseling.”

Trina Young Greer, Psy.D. in Counseling, 2000 Owner & Executive Director of Genesis Counseling Center

“As a Navy chaplain, I appreciated how Regent's master’s program integrated the best of science with faith and how it was designed with the flexibility I needed.”

Rob Hess, M.S. in Psychology, 2019 Chaplain, U.S. Navy

“Regent has exposed me to so much. I’ve had so many opportunities to learn and grow as both an advanced clinician and as an educator.”

Gus Tan, Ph.D., 2010 Counselor Education and Supervision

“I'm grateful for my Regent mentors. Their emphasis on relationships and guidance has helped me navigate a challenging yet rewarding journey.”

Alexandra Melchiorre, M.S. in Psychology, 2018 Registered Behavioral Technician