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Pursue a film major at Regent University, a premier Christian university located in Virginia Beach.

B.A. in Cinema-Television

Lights. Camera. Action.

This is more than just a film degree. It’s a platform for you to inspire, teach, and entertain. Regent’s Bachelor of Arts in Cinema-Television degree will help prepare you to enter the entertainment industry so you can share your artistry and life-changing stories with the world.

On Campus
120+
January 11, 2021
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EXPERIENCE THE BEST

Grow your technical proficiency with access to over $1 million worth of film and video equipment.

FUEL YOUR PASSION THROUGH A FILM MAJOR

Gain the necessary skills to produce, direct and edit. Learn how to operate a camera, edit, and control sound and lighting for maximum impact.

SHAPE YOUR WORLD

Explore all aspects of film production, media studies, and storytelling.

ALIGN YOURSELF WITH EXCELLENCE

Regent is ranked among top national universities by U.S. News & World Report, 2020. Presented from a Christian worldview, the in-demand cinema-television degree is supported by award-winning faculty in Virginia Beach. Meet the faculty.

On completing the B.A. in Cinema-Television program you will be able to:

  • Convey ideas and stories to traditional and online audiences.
  • Understand how to operate a camera, edit, and control sound and lighting for maximum impact.
  • Explore the business of animation and 2-D design methods.

Career Opportunities:

  • Feature films
  • Broadcast television
  • Corporate video
  • Internet video production
12%
Projected growth for employment of producers & directors from 2016 to 2026 Bureau of Labor Statistics

Explores the roles of the various people and positions involved in the production of animation. Pitching, budgeting, and business plans are covered. Each student submits a budget and a business plan for a project. Students also present a pitch for their final project. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Concepts of film aesthetics and analysis; exposure to classical Hollywood, documentary and European art cinema. Emphasis on describing and analyzing film style.

How to develop and create a good story for film. Covering the theory and application of story fundamentals, character creation, story structure and script formatting.
The history of film from the early 20th century to the present. Attention given to contributions of various national and international filmmakers and production trends.

Basic principles of film production, including camera operation (focus, exposure, depth-of-field, and lenses), composition, sequencing, screen direction, camera moves, and basic lighting. The class will include skills exercises and story-centric projects. Prerequisites: CTVU 101 and CTVU 105.

Explores the visual techniques used in cinema, television, and other media. Students focus on aesthetics and styles while gaining hands-on experience with cinematography equipment.

Non-linear editing process focusing on CODECs, tools and techniques as they relate to the post production process and workflow. Prerequisites: CTVU 101, CTVU 102, and CTVU 105.

Covers the techniques and practices of sound recording for location, studio, ADR and Foley. Includes double and single system techniques, as well as sound recording equipment.
Students examine the techniques employed in directing in workshop environment. Explores working with actors, director’s tools, script analysis, blocking, and working relationships on set.
Explores the organizational core of production crew, including the unit production manager, the first and second assistant directors, the production office coordinator, and the production auditor. How a film is managed from development to post-production. Essential production paperwork and contracts.

The art of single camera information gathering for edited roll-in packages. Prerequisites: CTVU 229 and CTVU 250.

Advances the directing student’s ability to analyze a scripted scene or sequence, develop a unique vision derived through text analysis, and then communicate the vision through carefully designed camera movement and choreographed actor staging. Prerequisite: CTVU 260.

Theory and practice of editing and post-production for both film and video. Aesthetics of narrative and documentary editing stressed for both picture and sound. Prerequisites: ANIM 121 and CTVU 345.

Creation of a show concept from research and development to proposal to production of a live five-minute webisode. Emphasis placed on the role of the television producer and director, including strategies related to news, comedy, talk, reality and drama. Prerequisite: CTVU 350.
Examines how the production designer and art director create an imaginative world through visual storytelling. Key aspects of screen design, script analysis and interpretation. Prerequisites: CTVU 260 and CTVU 327.
Continues a two-semester long comprehensive project along with CTVU 496. Students advance skills in editing, sound design, minor special effects and color correction, as applied to the senior project. Prerequisites: CTVU 496 and Senior standing.

Provides the student with an understanding of the techniques and practices of sound recording for location, TV studio, ADR and Foley in the film and television industries, including double and single system techniques, as well as sound recording equipment. Prerequisite: CTVU 346.

Historical study of traditional and new forms of documentary in film and television. Students progress through all stages of production from conception through post-production to accomplish a short documentary. Prerequisite: CTVU 362.
Laboratory course that covers operating cameras, creating graphics, technical operations, controlling audio and floor-managing live productions. Develops production work from previous writing workshops for sitcoms. Prerequisite: CTVU 430.

Student directed project in cinema-television. Students write, produce, direct, and edit a project, demonstrating proficiency in these areas. Prerequisites: CTVU 470 and Senior Standing.

Admission requirements vary based on the stage you’re at in life. Select a link below to learn how to apply.

2019-20 Tuition Rates

Program Type Tuition

On-Campus Student

  • 12-18 credit hours per semester
  • Under 12 credit hours
  • Over 18 credit hours

 

  • $8,610 (block rate)
  • $605/credit hour
  • $574/credit hour

Online Student (enrolled in 8-week classes)

  • Full-time (12* credit hours)
  • Part-time (6* credit hours)

*Average number of credits per semester.

 

  • $395/credit hour
  • $450/credit hour

RN to B.S. in Nursing Tuition

  • $295/credit hour

 

Student Fees

Fee

Amount

Description

Application Fee (On-Campus & Evening/Online Students)

 

$50

One-time fee, nonrefundable

Enrollment Deposit (On-Campus Students)

Enrollment Deposit (Evening/Online Students)

$150

$50

Fee is deducted from tuition costs

Graduation Fee(On-Campus & Evening/Online Students)

$60

One-time fee upon submission of graduation application

University Services Fee(On-Campus Students)

University Services Fee(Online Students)

$700/semester

$550/semester

Contributes to university academic and administrative operations

 

Optional Fees

Late Payment

$100/Session

Incurred per session in the event of late tuition payment

Course Fees

Varies,
$70-200 per course

Some courses in theater, animation, cinema television or science labs carry an additional fee

2020-21 Tuition Rates

Program Type Tuition

On-Campus Student

  • 12-18 credit hours per semester
  • Under 12 credit hours
  • Over 18 credit hours

 

  • $8,610 (block rate)
  • $574/credit hour
  • $574/credit hour

Online Student (enrolled in 8-week classes)

  • Full-time (12* credit hours)
  • Part-time (6* credit hours)

*Average number of credits per semester.

 

  • $395/credit hour
  • $450/credit hour

RN to B.S. in Nursing Tuition

  • $295/credit hour

 

Student Fees

Fee

Amount

Description

Application Fee (On-Campus & Evening/Online Students)

 

$50

One-time fee, nonrefundable

Enrollment Deposit (On-Campus Students)

Enrollment Deposit (Evening/Online Students)

$150

$50

Fee is deducted from tuition costs

Graduation Fee(On-Campus & Evening/Online Students)

$60

One-time fee upon submission of graduation application

University Services Fee(On-Campus Students)

University Services Fee(Online Students)

$750/semester

$600/semester

Contributes to university academic and administrative operations

 

Optional Fees

Late Payment

$100/Session

Incurred per session in the event of late tuition payment

Course Fees

Varies,
$70-200 per course

Some courses in theater, animation, cinema television or science labs carry an additional fee

“I truly believe God called me to be a journalist. Perhaps one of the most important lessons that I learned from Regent is to tell stories as best as I can through the lens of God. ”

Ashley Smith, M.A. in Journalism, 2013 Daybreak Anchor and Traffic/News Reporter, 13News Now (WVEC)

“I am thrilled, delighted and honored to be used for His purpose.”

Jennifer Bennett, B.S., 2007; M.A. in Organizational Leadership & Management, 2011 Organizational, Workforce, Strategic Planning and Leadership Management, U.S. Navy (Washington Navy Yard)

“The professors here never allowed me to settle for good, always pushing me towards giving my best.”

Padmakshi "Paddy" Parkhe, M.A., 2011 Journalism

“I visited Regent during my brother’s first semester as a graduate student, toured the gorgeous campus, and realized I was called to Regent too.”

Abbie Braswell, B.S. in Business, 2020 Former Resident Assistant, Regent University

“I have loved every minute of the Honor’s program. One thing that has continually surprised me has been the willingness of faculty members to take you under their wing and help you improve your skills.”

Luke Isbell, B.A. in International Studies, 2020 Full-time student; professional photographer