Imagery of Regent people and campus

Editorial Style Guide

Last updated: May 2008

M

Mission statement

Regent’s mission statement should always appear as follows in italics: Christian Leadership to Change the World.


Months (and commas)

When a sentence uses only a month and year, do not separate with a comma. When referring to a month, day and year, set off the day and year with commas.


Examples:

March 1994 was colder than usual.
April 28, 1957, was the day she was born.

Moot Courtroom

Courtroom should be spelled as one word and should be capitalized in reference to the Moot Courtroom.

 

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N


Net

(See also Web)
Abbreviated form of Internet. The term Net is no longer commonly used. Avoid if possible. Use web instead.

 

New Testament

New Testament is always capitalized, but need not be placed in quotes or italics.


Nondiscriminatory statements

The following nondiscriminatory policy applies to all schools of the university with the exception of the School of Divinity:
Regent University admits students without discrimination on the basis of race, color, disability, gender, religion, or national or ethnic origin.


School of Divinity nondiscriminatory policy:
Regent University admits students without discrimination on the basis of race, color, gender, disability, or national or ethnic origin.


Nonsexist references

Use equal standards for men and women in deciding whether to include specific mention of personal appearance or marital and family situation. Copy should not assume maleness when both sexes are involved.


Incorrect Example:

Jackson told newsmen.


Correct Example:

Jackson told reporters.


Treatment of the sexes should be free of assumptions and stereotypes. Words such as mankind and humanity are still proper choices.


The use of he/she is acceptable, but often clumsy. S/he is often used now.


Numbers

When referring to numbers in regular body copy, the numbers one to nine are spelled out. Numbers 10 and up are written in numerical form. The parallel structure of ratios is an exception to this rule.


Examples:

They had eight registrants, but 11 showed up.
The ratio of students to faculty is 12-to-1 (not 12-to-one).


When a number is used to begin a sentence, it is always spelled out. (Years are an exception to this rule.)


Example:

Two hundred thirty-three students received their degrees at the university's 11th commencement.

Years are written in numerals even when they begin a sentence.


Example:

1989 was a pivotal year for the organization.


Percentages: When using a number before the word percent, use numerals (even if the number is from one to nine).


Examples:

We have seen a 7 percent increase over last year.
Financial aid is available to 70 percent of our students.


The only exception is if the numeral is at the beginning of a sentence.


Example:

Fifty-three percent of student internship placements are in government settings and 12 percent are in political campaigns.


Do not use the % symbol except in graphs, charts, etc. Spell out the word percent.

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O

Offices of the university

The titles of official offices of the university are capitalized.


Examples:

Office of the President
University Marketing


Shortened versions of the official office titles may be used, and also should be capitalized.


Examples:

President’s Office
Communication Admissions Office


Uses that refer to the work done in an office or to the title of a person who works in an office are not capitalized. (See also Titles)


Examples:

Pick up an admissions packet in the Admissions Office.
The executive vice president will have the information you need.


Old Testament

Old Testament is always capitalized, but does not require italicizing.


On campus

The phrase on campus can be used in two ways—one with a hyphen, one without. If the phrase modifies an immediately following noun, then it is hyphenated. Otherwise, it is not.


Examples:

I attend school on campus.
I am enrolled in the on-campus program.


Online

Do not hyphenate online.


Example:

Regent has several online programs.

 

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