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Regent Law Alumni Weekend

Legal Learning Festival & Law Alumni Weekend

Regent University School of Law
October 1-2, 2021

Welcome! We are so looking forward to you joining us for our 3rd Annual Legal Learning Festival & Law School Alumni Weekend. We have a wonderful virtual weekend planned for you and we look forward to seeing you on-line. Please click below to register and to learn more about the weekend we have to share with you.

Note: all times listed are Eastern Daylight Time (EDT).

Friday, October 1, 2021 – Legal Learning Festival

9:00 am – 10:00 amWriting Right to Promote Legal Ethical Obligations of Competency and Diligence (VA & NC CLE – 1 Ethics Credit Approved)
Janis L. Kirkland, Director, Legal Analysis, Research, and Writing Program, and Principal Lecturer, Regent University School of Law
10:15 am – 11:15 amUpdate on Marriage: Societal Response to Marriage Law Changes & What Lawyers Can Do to Make a Difference for Clients (VA & NC CLE – 1 General Credit Approved)
Lynne Marie Kohm, John Brown McCarty Professor of Family Law, Regent University School of Law and Kathleen E. Akers, Senior Associate, Epsilon Economics
11:30 am – 12:30 pmThe Federal Rule of Evidence that is Nothing but a Trap for the Unwary (VA & NC CLE – 1 General Credit Approved)
James Duane, Professor, Regent University School of Law
12:30 pm – 1:30 pmBreak
1:30 pm – 2:30 pmThe Other Title VII Secret (VA & NC CLE – 1 General Credit Approved)
Bruce N. Cameron, Reed Larson Professor of Labor Law, Regent University School of Law.
2:45 pm – 3:45 pmThe Robertson Center for Constitutional Law at the United States Supreme Court: A Look Back and a Look Ahead (VA & NC CLE – 1 General Credit Approved)
Bradley J. Lingo, Executive Director, Robertson Center for Constitutional Law, and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and Associate Professor, Regent University School of Law
4:00 pm – 5:00 pmVirtual Law: The Ethical Issues of Remote Lawyering in Post-Pandemic Law Practice (VA & NC CLE – 1 Ethics CLE Approved)
L.O. Natt Gantt II, Professor, Regent University School of Law & Executive Director of the Program on Biblical Law and Christian Legal Studies and Lecturer on Law, Harvard Law School and Benjamin V. Madison III, Director, Center for Ethnical Formation and Legal Education Reform, and Professor, Regent University School of Law

Saturday, October 2, 2021 – Law Review Symposium – Section 230 of the Communication Decency Act (Free)

10:00 am – 11:30 amPanel 1: Content Moderation and Censorship: Have Online Platforms Become The Invisible Big Brother? (NC CLE – 1.5 General Credits Approved / VA Pending Approval)
Moderator: Hon. Ken Starr, 39th Solicitor General of the United States, currently Of Counsel to The Lanier Law Firm
Michael Farris, president and CEO of Alliance Defending Freedom
Claire Guthrie Gastañaga, former executive director of the ACLU of Virginia
Hon. Ken Cuccinelli, 46th Attorney General of Virginia, former Senior Official Performing the Duties of the Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security (USCIS)
12:00 pm – 12:30 pmCommentary on Section 230
Hon. Thom Tillis, United States Senate (North Carolina)
12:30 pm – 1:00 pmPerspectives on Free Speech
Jay Sekulow, Chief Counsel, American Center for Law and Justice; Chief Justice Mark Martin (ret.), Dean and Professor, Regent Law School
1:30 pm – 3:00 pmPanel 2: Looking Back & Looking Forward: Moving Towards A Better 230 Or Beyond It? (NC CLE – 1.5 General Credits Approved / VA Pending Approval)
Moderator: Hon. Beth A. Williams, former Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Policy at the United States Department of Justice
Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Dean for Research at Santa Clara University School of Law
Thomas Johnson, Jr., partner co-chair firm’s Appellate Practice at Wiley Rein in Washington, DC, former General Counsel of the Federal Communications Commission
Enrique Armijo, Professor of Law at Elon University School of Law, Affiliate Fellow of the Yale Law School Information Society Project, and the Center for Technology, Information, and Public Life at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Thank you for joining us here at Regent University for our Legal Learning Festival. It is an exciting time for us to offer an incredible array of continuing legal education presenters and programs.

The links to access the CLE materials will be made available closer to the event.

Director, Epsilon Economics

Kathleen E. Akers is Director at Epsilon Economics in Chicago, IL, which offers economic expert opinions in litigation, typically in the context of intellectual property and international trade matters. She has a B. A. in economics from the University of Chicago, and an M.B.A. from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.  She has co-authored Law and Economics in Jane Austen (Lexington Books 2020), and published Kathleen E. Akers and Lynne Marie Kohm, Solving Millennial Marriage Evolution, 48 U. BALT. L. REV. 1 (2018). 

Professor of Law, Elon University School of Law

Enrique Armijo is Professor of Law at Elon University School of Law, and an Affiliate Fellow of the Yale Law School Information Society Project and the Center for Technology, Information, and Public Life at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He teaches and researches in the areas of the First Amendment, constitutional law, torts, administrative law, media and internet law, and international freedom of expression. His work has been cited by the Federal Communications Commission, the Federal Election Commission, and other agencies, as well as in testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs. He has worked on media and communications reform projects in Myanmar (Burma) for the U.S. Department of State with Annenberg’s Center for Global Communications Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to joining Elon Law, Professor Armijo practiced with Covington & Burling LLP in Washington, D.C., where he advised journalists, news organizations and trade associations on media law-related issues. As an appellate lawyer, Armijo briefed cases in the U.S. Supreme Court and briefed or argued cases in the federal and state courts of appeal. Before entering private practice, Armijo was a Visiting Scholar at the Programme for Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford’s Centre for Socio-Legal Studies. Professor Armijo clerked for the Honorable Karen LeCraft Henderson of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit after law school. He earned his B.A. from the University of Florida, his M.A. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his J.D. from the University of North Carolina, where he was Editor-in-Chief of the North Carolina Law Review.

Reed Larson Professor of Labor Law, Regent University School of Law

Professor Bruce N. Cameron teaches Employment Discrimination with a Focus on Faith, Labor Law, and administers the Right to Work Practicum. Prior to coming to Regent, he spent over 30 years litigating religious freedom and constitutional law cases in the employment context. During that time, he never lost a Title VII religious accommodation case in court. He counseled employees in virtually every state as to their rights and formally represented clients in administrative or judicial proceedings in at least 25 states.

Prof. Cameron is the author of 29 published articles on the topics of religion, Constitutional law, the rights of religious dissenters, and labor law. He is the co-author, along with Thomas Haggard, of the third edition of Understanding Employment Discrimination (Carolina Press). He co-authored a section of a judicial handbook entitled A Judicial Guide To Labor and Employment Law published by Lawyers Weekly Publications. He is also the author of the weekly Bible studies on the popular web site www.GoBible.org.

Cameron was an Andrews Scholar, an intern with the U.S. Attorney’s Office, and a member of the U.S. Department of Justice Honors Program. He was a member of the Virginia State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights (2015-2019); the Federalist Society, the Christian Legal Society, several state bars, and a number of federal bars, including the Bar of the U.S. Supreme Court. He has appeared frequently on television and radio shows, including appearances on Dr. Dobson’s Focus on the Family. His hobbies over the years are sports cars, cycling, sailing, and studying and teaching the Bible. He is currently cycling 2,000 miles every twelve months.

Former Attorney General of Virginia

The Honorable Ken Cuccinelli, II, previously served as the Senior Official Performing the Duties of the Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security from 2019 to 2021 and also served as the Principal Deputy and Senior Official Performing the Duties of the Director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). From 2010 to 2014, Attorney General Cuccinelli also served as the Attorney General of Virginia. Prior to this, he had been a Republican member of the Virginia State Senate since 2002, representing the thirty-seventh congressional district. The Honorable Ken Cuccinelli currently serves as the national chairman of the Election Transparency Initiative. He received his J.D. from George Mason’s Antonin Scalia Law School, his M.A. from George Mason University, and his undergraduate engineering degree from the University of Virginia. 

Professor, Regent University School of Law

James Duane is a Professor at Regent Law School in Virginia Beach, Virginia, where he received the University’s Faculty Excellence Award in 2002, 2010, 2012, and 2017. He has taught as a faculty associate at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society, as a Distinguished Visiting Professor at William & Mary Law School in 2009 and 2011, and has served since 1995 on the faculty at the National Trial Advocacy College at the University of Virginia School of Law. He is the co-author of Weissenberger’s Federal Evidence, and is a member of the panel of academic contributors to Black’s Law Dictionary. He received his A.B. magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1981, where he was Phi Beta Kappa, and his J.D. cum laude from Harvard Law School in 1984. He clerked for the Hon. Michael A. Telesca of the United States District Court for the Western District of New York, and the Hon. Ellsworth A. Van Graafeiland on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. He was senior associate at the law firm of Connors & Vilardo in Buffalo, New York, where he practiced civil litigation and criminal defense. In 2008, he gave a talk at Regent about why even innocent criminal suspects should never agree to answer questions from the police, and that video has been viewed over 15,000,000 times on YouTube. Professor Duane is a descendant of Judge James Duane of New York, the first judge appointed to the newly-created federal judiciary by President George Washington in 1789.

President and CEO, Alliance Defending Freedom

Michael Farris is president and CEO of Alliance Defending Freedom. Additionally, Farris was founding president of both the Home School Legal Defense Association (1983) and Patrick Henry College (2000) and continues to serve as chairman of the board of HSLDA and chancellor emeritus of PHC. Farris has specialized in constitutional appellate litigation. In that capacity, he has argued before the appellate courts of 13 states, eight federal circuit courts of appeal, and the U.S. Supreme Court, where in 2018 he successfully argued NIFLA v. Becerra. Additonally, Farris has testified many times before both the House and Senate. He was an executive committee member of the Coalition for the Free Exercise of Religion that successfully lobbied Congress for the passage of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993. Additionally, he has authored of over 15 books, as well as law review and other scholarly and popular articles. Michael Farris received his J.D., with honors, from Gonzaga University and his LL.M., with honors, in public international law from the University of London, and graduated from Western Washington State College magna cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in political science.

L.O. Natt Gantt II, Professor, Regent University School of Law & Executive Director of the Program on Biblical Law and Christian Legal Studies and Lecturer on Law, Harvard Law School

Natt Gantt received his A.B. in psychology and political science, summa cum laude, from Duke University; his Juris Doctor, cum laude, from Harvard Law School; and his Master of Divinity, summa cum laude, from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. Before joining Regent in 2000, he served as a law clerk to the late Honorable Donald S. Russell of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit; as an associate at Wiley, Rein & Fielding in Washington, D.C.; and as a proxy analyst at Fidelity Investments in Boston, Massachusetts.

Professor Gantt teaches Contracts, Professional Responsibility, and co-teaches Foundations of Practice, Regent’s required professional formation course for first-year students. He also co-founded Regent’s Center for Ethical Formation and Legal Education Reform. During his time at Regent, Professor Gantt’s scholarship and presentations have focused on two primary areas: (1) law school academic support and legal education reform and (2) legal ethics and professional identity formation. He served from 2010 to 2013 as a faculty member for the Virginia State Bar Harry L. Carrico Professionalism Course and from 2018 to 2019 as a member of the Virginia State Bar President’s Special Committee on Lawyer Well-Being. He also has served from 2018 to 2021 as a faculty member for the Christian Legal Society Fellows Program and as an Arbitrator on the Virginia State Bar Circuit Committee, Resolution of Fee Disputes, Virginia Beach. He currently serves a member of the ABA Commission on Lawyer Assistance Programs (CoLAP) Advisory Commission and chairs CoLAP’s Well-Being Committee. On September 1, 2021, he began serving as the Executive Director of the Program on Biblical Law and Christian Legal Studies and Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School.

Professor of Law, Santa Clara University School of Law

Eric Goldman is a Professor of Law and Dean for Research at Santa Clara University School of Law in the Silicon Valley. He also co-directs the High Tech Law Institute and supervises the Privacy Law Certificate. He joined the Santa Clara Law faculty in 2006. His research and teaching focuses on Internet, intellectual property and advertising law topics, for which Managing IP magazine has twice named him to a shortlist of North American “IP Thought Leaders,” and he has been named an “IP Vanguard” by the California State Bar’s IP Section. Goldman publishes the Technology & Marketing Law Blog, which covers Internet Law, Intellectual Property, and Advertising Law. The blog has received several awards, including being named to the ABA Journal’s Blawg 100 Hall of Fame. Before joining the Santa Clara Law faculty, he was an assistant professor at Marquette University Law School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Before that, he practiced law for eight years in the Silicon Valley as General Counsel of Epinions.com and an Internet and technology transactions attorney at Cooley Godward LLP. Eric Goldman received his BA, summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa, in Economics/Business from UCLA in 1988. He received his JD from UCLA in 1994, where he was a member of the UCLA Law Review, and concurrently received his MBA from the Anderson School at UCLA.

Former Executive Director, ALCU

Claire Guthrie Gastañaga recently ended a nine-year tenure as the executive director of the ACLU of Virginia, where she helped lead collaborative efforts to protect and expand voting rights, including a constitutional amendment to guarantee the right to vote, and to reform the criminal legal system including legalizing marijuana, bringing accountability to policing and ending solitary confinement. While she was executive director, the ACLU challenged the use of automated license plate readers by police to engage in passive surveillance, initiated successful class action litigation that helped bring marriage equality to Virginia and represented Gavin Grimm in the recently concluded, long-running case that secured protection against discrimination for transgender students. Named by Virginia Lawyer’s Weekly in 2010 as one of 50 Women of Influence in Virginia and as the 2019 Leader in the Law, Gastañaga has been a key player in Virginia state government, serving as Chief of Staff and Special Counsel to the Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates and as the first woman Chief Deputy Attorney General of Virginia.  While in the Virginia Attorney General’s office, she argued cases in the Supreme Court of the United States and in the Supreme Court of Virginia. Claire Guthrie Gastañaga received her J.D. from the University of Virginia and her bachelor’s degree from Michigan State University. Claire has co-authored op-eds with Ken Cuccinelli, II, on issues related to data privacy and government surveillance.

Partner, Wiley Rein

Thomas Johnson, Jr. is a partner at Wiley Rein in Washington, DC and serves as co-chair of the firm’s Appellate Practice. Prior to joining Wiley, Thomas was the General Counsel at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) under the Trump Administration, where he served as the agency’s chief legal officer and briefed dozens of appeals. Prior to his time at the FCC, Mr. Johnson served as the Deputy Solicitor General of West Virginia. From 2006 to 2016, he worked in private practice for 10 years at Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP in Washington, DC where he specialized in appellate and regulatory litigation and labor and employment matters. Mr. Johnson frequently speaks and writes on legal issues and his articles have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, National Review, Forbes, and Newark Star-Ledger. Thomas Johnson, Jr. received his J.D., magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School, and his undergraduate degree, magna cum laude, from Georgetown University. At Harvard Law School, Johnson served as the Deputy Editor-in-Chief of Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy. Johnson clerked for the Honorable Jerry E. Smith, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, during the 2005-2006 term.

Director, Legal Analysis, Research, and Writing Program, and Principal Lecturer, Regent University School of Law

Janis Kirkland directs Regent Law’s Legal Analysis, Research, and Writing program. She has taught Legal Analysis, Research, and Writing for the law school since 1997, and also has taught Environmental Law. She has participated in the Legal Writing Institute, holding numerous committee positions and presenting at multiple writing programs. She also is editor of the textbook used for Regent Law’s writing program and has worked in recent years to incorporate an increasing level of professionalism into the law school’s writing curriculum. Janis Kirkland is a graduate of T.C. Williams School of Law at the University of Richmond, where she was Valedictorian of her law class and was a member of the law review. She also has a B.S. in Chemistry from the College of William and Mary and worked as an analytical chemist dealing with environmental issues prior to attending law school. Prior to teaching, she practiced environmental law at Hunton and Williams (now Hunton, Andrews & Kurth). She remains interested in environmental issues and wrote many articles as a regular contributing author for EPA Administrative Law Reporter and for Chemical Waste Litigation Reporter.

John Brown McCarty Professor of Family Law, Regent University School of Law

Professor Lynne Marie Kohm serves as the John Brown McCarty Professor of Family Law at Regent University School of Law. Teaching Family Law for 28 years at Regent Law and addressing the topics of marriage, families, and parental rights around the country, Kohm has published prolifically on legal areas of concern to families. A Certified Guardian ad Litem, prior to teaching, Kohm practiced law in New York and is licensed in Virginia, New York, Florida, Massachusetts, and the District of Columbia.

Bradley J. Lingo, Executive Director, Robertson Center for Constitutional Law, and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and Associate ProfessorRegent University School of Law

Professor Lingo is the founding executive director of the Robertson Center for Constitutional Law.  He also teaches a variety of courses including State Constitutional Law, Appellate Advocacy, and Contracts.

While at the Robertson Center, Professor Lingo has filed amicus briefs in the U.S. circuit courts and U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of clients who include former members of Congress and ministries such as Intervarsity, Campus Crusade for Christ, and the Christian Legal Society.  His writing has been published by National Review Online, The Federalist Society, The Center for Christian Thought and Action, and The Regent University Law Review.

Before joining the Regent University School of Law faculty in 2019, Professor Brad Lingo was a partner in King & Spalding’s Trial and Global Disputes practice group. His work encompassed a broad array of high-stakes trial and appellate matters.  Among other accomplishments, he was one of the lead trial lawyers in what is believed to be the highest-stakes case in U.S. history to be tried by an accounting firm to a complete defense verdict.

Lingo also litigated a number of religious-liberty cases while in private practice. Accounts of this work have appeared on the front pages of The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal. He served as president of the Federalist Society’s Charlotte Chapter from 2013 to 2019, and he served by appointment of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights on the Commission’s North Carolina State Advisory Committee from 2016-2019.

Before his career with King & Spalding, Lingo practiced in the Washington, D.C. office of Gibson Dunn. He also served as a law clerk to the Honorable Morris Sheppard Arnold of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit.

He received his law degree, cum laude, from Harvard Law School, where he served as an executive editor of the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy. Lingo graduated first in his class and summa cum laude from Grove City College.

Director, Center for Ethical Formation and Legal Education Reform and Professor, Regent University School of Law

Professor Benjamin Madison, before going into law teaching, was a partner on the Litigation Team at Hunton, Andrews & Kurth. He joined Regent School of Law in 2003 as a full-time professor and teaches primarily civil procedure, pretrial practice and procedure, and the legal profession. He is a co-founder and co-Director of the Center for Ethical Formation & Legal Education Reform (CEFLER) at Regent. His pretrial practice casebook, Civil Procedure for All States: A Context and Practice Casebook (2010), has drawn praise as one of the first casebooks designed according to the recommendations of the Carnegie Institute’s Educating Lawyers (2007). For his effort in implementing the Carnegie recommendations, he was elected a Fellow of Educating Tomorrow’s Lawyers, the organization founded by the lead author of Educating Lawyers, William Sullivan. Ben co-authored a chapter with Dean Natt Gantt entitled “Teaching Knowledge, Skills, and Values of Professional Identity Formation,” included in the book Building on Best Practices: Transforming Legal Education in a Changing World (2015). Ben has served on various committees at the state bar level and in academic conferences designed to promote reform in legal education, especially those focused on cultivating formation of professional identity and principled ethical decision-making. Along with CEFLER co-founder Dean Natt Gantt, Ben developed Regent’s a new first-year course, “Foundations of Law,” designed to help students become intentional in their ethical professional formation and in discerning their calling in law. Ben has authored numerous articles on legal education reform and on methods that promote moral and ethical formation and decision-making, and to helping students and lawyers find fulfillment in law practice. He has spoken at conferences across the country, including conferences of the American Association of Law Professors, the Institute for Law Teaching, Educating Tomorrow’s Lawyers, the Nootbar Institute for Law and Religions, the Holloran Center for Ethical Leadership in the Professions, and the Southeastern Association of Law Schools. In recent years, Ben has served as Regent’s Director of Bar Pass Initiatives and has led Regent to its highest Bar pass rankings ever. Ben sees preparation for the Bar exam as a process that is integral to the law school’s preparation of the student to be a professional.

Dean and Professor, Regent University School of Law

The Honorable Mark Martin is Dean and Professor at Regent University School of Law. Martin served as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina from 2014-2019. Chief Justice Martin has held many national and state leadership roles. Martin currently serves as chair of the Thomsen Reuters Judicial Advisory Council. He served previously as a member of the Committee on Federal-State Jurisdiction of the Judicial Conference of the United States.  He also served as a member of the Board of Directors of the Conference of Chief Justice. He chaired the ABA Judicial Division in 2013-2014, ABA Appellate Judges Conference in 2011-2012, and Appellate Judges Education Institute Board of Directors in 2012-2013. At the state level, Martin chaired the Commission on Professionalism, the Equal Access to Justice Commission, and the Commission on the Future of the North Carolina Business Court. Martin received the 2019 ABA Robert B. Yegge Award for Outstanding Contribution in the Field of Judicial Administration, the North Carolina Bar Association 2019 Liberty Bell Award, and the 2011 Warren Burger Society Award of the National Center for State Courts. Martin is an elected member of the American Law Institute. He is the Chapter Advisor of the Regent Law School Federalist Society. Chief Justice Martin received his LL.M. in Judicial Process from the University of Virginia School of Law, his J.D. with honors from the University of North Carolina School of Law, and his undergraduate degree with highest honors from Western Carolina University. After graduating from law school, Martin served as law clerk for the late United States Judge Clyde H. Hamilton. He is married and the proud father of five children.

Chief Counsel of the American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ)

Jay Sekulow is Chief Counsel of the American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ), one of the most prestigious law firms in the country. He is an accomplished Supreme Court advocate, renowned expert on religious liberty, a number 1 New York Times-bestselling author, and a respected broadcaster. He has worked to protect religious and constitutional freedoms in the courts, in Congress, and in the public arena. At the Supreme Court of the United States, Jay Sekulow has argued 12 cases—including several landmark cases which have become part of the legal landscape in the area of religious liberty litigation.

Immediately following graduation from law school, he served as a tax trial attorney in the Office of Chief Counsel for the Internal Revenue Service. Jay Sekulow received his Ph.D. from Regent University, with a dissertation on American Legal History. He is an honors graduate of Mercer Law School, where he served on the Mercer Law Review, and also received his undergraduate degree, with honors, from Mercer University.

The Honorable Ken Starr, currently Of Counsel to The Lanier Law Firm, Starr served as president and chancellor of Baylor University and dean of the Pepperdine School of Law. He has argued 36 cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, including during his service as U.S. Solicitor General. He served as United States Circuit Judge for the District of Columbia Circuit, as Counselor and Chief of Staff to U.S. Attorney General William French Smith, and law clerk to both Chief Justice Warren E. Burger and to Fifth Circuit Judge David W. Dyer. He was appointed to serve as Independent Counsel for five investigations, including Whitewater, from 1994 to 1999. For 25 years, he taught current constitutional issues as an adjunct or visiting professor at five law schools. Starr also was a partner at two national law firms, Kirkland & Ellis LLP and Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP, specializing in appellate law. He serves on the boards of Advocates International and the Christian Legal Society as well as the Advisory Board of Alliance Defending Freedom. Throughout his professional career, he has championed the cause of religious liberty and freedom of conscience for all persons. After graduating from San Antonio’s Sam Houston High School, he earned his B.A. from George Washington University, his M.A. from Brown University, and his J.D. degree from Duke University Law School. Starr has received numerous honors and awards, including the Edmund Randolph Award for Outstanding Service in the Department of Justice and three honorary doctorates.

Former Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Policy

The Honorable Beth A. Williams served as Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Policy at the United States Department of Justice from August 2017 to December 2020.   In that role, she served as the primary policy advisor to the Attorney General and the Deputy Attorney General, and as the Chief Regulatory Officer for the Department. She also led the judicial nomination process for the Department, assisting in the selection and confirmation of more than 230 Article III judges to the bench, more than any President has appointed in a single term since 1980.  Prior to becoming Assistant Attorney General, Ms. Williams was a litigation and appellate partner at Kirkland & Ellis LLP in Washington, DC, where her practice focused on complex commercial, securities, and First Amendment litigation. From 2005-2006, Ms. Williams served as Special Counsel to the United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary, where she assisted with the confirmation of Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr. and Associate Justice Samuel A. Alito, Jr. to the United States Supreme Court. Ms. Williams received her J.D. from Harvard Law School, where she served as Executive Editor of the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy, and graduated from Harvard College magna cum laude, with a degree in History and Literature. Williams clerked for the Honorable Richard C. Wesley, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, during the 2004-2005 term.

Thank you for your interest in Regent University School of Law’s Legal Learning Festival, Law Review Symposium and Law Alumni Weekend.

For information or questions, please contact the Law Dean’s Office.

Emailmarybun@regent.edu

Phone757.352.4040