Professional Formation & Practical Skills Training

Law students learn the law and how to analyze it before they become a lawyer, but they are often ill-equipped with the practical lawyer training and professional tools they need to practice law successfully. Regent Law’s professional formation combines traditional legal study with hands-on training and ethical formation in the context of a Christian worldview. Our degree will equip you to become a lawyer who is well-prepared to meet the demands you will encounter in your profession.

Our graduates enter the legal field as fully integrated lawyers with a thorough knowledge of the law, skills to put their knowledge to use, and personal wellness necessary to succeed. We guarantee the availability of the following opportunities:

Opportunities

Students receive mentoring from full-time faculty in the context of academic advising, as well as in other mentoring relationships. Mentoring arises from shared interests, faculty members’ practice expertise, and/or other personal and professional connections.

As experienced lawyers, faculty members impart an understanding of how to successfully engage in law practice. Mentors provide students with personal/spiritual coaching and discipling, academic advising, and career planning. Mentors meet frequently with students individually and in mentor groups.

Drawn from the local legal community, Regent alumni, and Christian lawyers around the country, a mentor is available to every student who requests one. These mentors are practicing lawyers who have volunteered to provide guidance to Regent law students. Usually, these mentor assignments are based on the student’s practice area of interest, geography (where the student intends to practice law), or both. Lawyer mentors are available to meet frequently and work with students, providing practical skills orientation, career coaching, and spiritual, professional, and ethical formation.

More than one-third of the courses offered in the law school feature the PractiSkills component. Not only do these courses teach students about the law, but they also train students how to practice law in that subject area. For example, our course in Civil Procedure includes practical lawyer training in drafting pleadings and engaging in discovery (depositions, interrogatories, etc.). Similarly, tax courses teach students what tax lawyers actually do for their clients. Review a list of current PractiSkills courses.

Students who choose to do so will compile a portfolio of practice documents and skills in his or her chosen area of practice. For example, a student who plans to engage in civil litigation practice may develop a portfolio of documents including a complaint, standard discovery requests, common motions, and a trial notebook, along with courtroom skills, all tailored to the student’s intended state of practice. A student entering business/transactional practice could graduate with a portfolio of Articles of Incorporation, merger agreements, securities forms, etc., and skills in negotiating business deals. Other practice portfolios can cover business law, estate planning, criminal defense/prosecution, and real estate transaction practice. Students may design their own multi-practice or specialty portfolios under the guidance of a faculty mentor.

Every student, upon request, may engage in a field placement for academic credit. Students will work in the law offices of a prosecutor, public defender, nonprofit or for-profit in-house counsel, or private practice attorney. The students’ work is overseen by a full-time law faculty member. Field placements may occur during the summer, or if the student is local, during an academic semester.

Select third-year students may be placed in an Apprenticeship Program. For one semester, the student will work and study as an apprentice under a carefully selected Christian attorney, either in the local Hampton Roads area, or in the city/region where the student intends to practice law. The student will simultaneously take online course work. The apprenticeship will be carefully monitored by a full-time law faculty member and will include professional/ethical formation, as well as skills training.

The curriculum emphasizes moral character, Christian formation, ethical decision making, and discipleship regarding what it means to be an integrated lawyer. Our Center for Ethical Formation & Legal Education Reform  develops students’ professional identities, producing lawyers who have an understanding of the nature and purpose of the legal profession and are committed to the ethical practice of law.

Students receive training in the life skills necessary to engage successfully in the business of law practice, including collaborative work skills, business models, basic accounting principles, and staff/employee management.

Students will receive instruction in core law office technology, and in other current cyber technologies used in the practice of law, including e-discovery, e-filing, cloud storage, and computing.

Skills Training

One of the foundational skills to becoming a successful lawyer is your ability to write well. At Regent Law, we provide a rigorous program that will equip you with the skills to do well in your studies, summer internships and beyond. In fact, our students are routinely amazed at how well prepared they are for their summer internships. Unlike most programs, Regent Law requires six credit hours of practical skills training per year. Students enroll in three credits each semester. Through first-year courses, you will:

  • Learn the core legal skills required for passing the bar and being an attorney
  • Write legal memos and briefs.
  • Learn to conduct legal research and analysis and do legal citation.

Our program provides practical skills classes in all areas so you can tailor your program to your interests.

You will take one or more skills classes in each of the following areas:

  • Written Skills: independent study, advanced legal writing, appellate advocacy, drafting contracts
  • Oral Skills: trial practice, negotiations, mediation, client counseling and interviewing, etc.
  • Experiential learning: For example, if you’re interested in litigation, your courses could include:
    • Client Interviewing and Counseling
    • Civil Pre-Trial Practice and Procedure (draft pleadings, discovery, take depositions)

Co-Curricular Opportunities

Second-year students can compete on teams and become a board member with Moot Court, Regent University Law Review, or Trial Advocacy.

  • Moot Court: Legal writing, appellate argument
    • Our Moot Court Program ranked 5th in the nation in 2016
    • Our students routinely win best brief and best oralist awards.
  • Regent University Law Review and Journal of Global Justice
  • Trial Advocacy: Train and compete in trial work
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution: Train and compete in mediation, negotiation, and other forms of ADR.

Internships & Externships

Internships and externships are another excellent way to gain practical experience prior to graduation.

Externships (An internship, but for class credit)

  • Earn up to 5 credits through externships (at different placements).
  • Be placed at judicial offices, law firms, nonprofits and with public defenders.
  • Easily secure an externship during the school year, as well as during the summer, due to our great location in Virginia Beach, Virginia

Internships

Led by a former Virginia judge, our career services staff will help you find legal internships during the summer to build your resume and help you gain great practical experience.

During your third year of law school, you have the option of taking electives or doing an apprenticeship.

Apprenticeships

  • Earn up to 10 credits working at a law firm, judge’s chambers, government office, etc.
  • Typically done during the last semester of law school.
  • Can be done in your home state, which could save you money if you choose to live at home.
  • Can help you get a job upon graduation.
  • Gain practical experience in a specialty area working for a lawyer for an entire semester. For example, if you’re interested in environmental law, we’ll place you with an environmental firm.
  • Working in the field is often a much better experience than taking electives.
  • We will help you secure an apprenticeship in your home town through our nationwide alumni network.
  • Students are often hired where they work, and even if they don’t get hired, they can network for a job their entire last semester.

Classes

Co-Curricular Opportunities

Third-year students can continue to compete on teams and become a board member with Moot Court, Regent University Law Review, or Trial Advocacy.

  • Moot Court: Legal writing, appellate argument
    • Our Moot Court Program ranked 5th in the nation in 2016
    • Our students routinely win best brief and best oralist awards.
  • Regent University Law Review and Journal of Global Justice
  • Trial Advocacy: Train and compete in trial work
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution: Train and compete in mediation, negotiation, and other forms of ADR.

Internships & Externships

Internships and externships are another excellent way to gain practical experience prior to graduation.

Externships (An internship, but for class credit)

  • Earn up to 5 credits through externships (at different placements).
  • Be placed at judicial offices, law firms, nonprofits and with public defenders.
  • Easily secure an externship during the school year, as well as during the summer, due to our great location in Virginia Beach, Virginia

Internships

Led by a former Virginia judge, our career services staff will help you find legal internships during the summer to build your resume and help you gain great practical experience.

Centers & Clinics

The American Center for Law and Justice
The ACLJ has an office on the fourth floor of our law school. They hire our students to work for pay or you can earn credit through our externship program.

The Center for Global Justice
Students work on legal projects for human rights organizations like ADF International, International Justice Mission, Shared Hope, the Uganda Attorney General, Advocates International, etc. Students have drafted briefs to the European Court of Human Rights, written legal memos to end land grabbing in Uganda, proposed legislation to combat child sacrifice, and helped do research to pass Virginia’s first every sex trafficking bill.

Civil Litigation Clinic
We have a clinic in downtown Norfolk (just opening!) that is right across from the Courthouse. Students represent real clients using their third-year practice certificate under the supervision of one of our professors.

Immigration Practicum/Clinic
A Regent Law grad and current adjunct (Hugo Valverde) runs his own immigration firm in VA Beach. Students can work at his firm and earn credit.

Child Advocacy Clinic
In this clinic, students work with Professor Lynne Kohm on legal matters relating to children. For example, one semester they drafted a brief on an important case before the VA Supreme Court relating to the rights of a father over frozen embryos.

National Right to Work Practicum
This practicum provides students interested in employee rights in the context of compulsory unionism, public interest law, and litigation the opportunity to work with the litigation staff of the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation. Sixty hours of research, writing, and litigation support are required per credit hour. 

Third-Year Practice Certificate
Virginia allows students to earn their third-year practice certificate whereby third-year students can practice law under the supervision of an attorney. Students can earn credit and work at firms, prosecutors and public defenders’ offices, governmental agencies, etc. and represent real clients!

Bar Prep

  • Core common law classes tested on every bar exam.
  • Regent Law students must take 5 or 6 credits (depending on the class) of Property, Torts, Contracts, and Civil Procedure. This is 1-2 credits more than most law schools but ensures that our students are well-prepared for the bar exam and that there is sufficient time to integrate biblical principles.
  • Core upper-level required classes tested on bar exams across the nation (E.g., Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, Evidence, Business Structures and Agency, UCC 2, Professional Responsibility)
  • Electives: Choose those classes that correlate with your bar exam (Family Law, Will, Trusts and Estates, Secured Transactions).
  • Electives and Core upper-level classes tested on all bar exams.
  • Bar Prep Classes: Up to 5 credits.
    • Two credits focus on reviewing 1L classes and drafting essays.
    • Two credits focus on preparing for the MBE (200 multiple choice questions; same on every bar exam). Students will take a simulated MBE test to get a real feel for the bar exam.
    • One credit focuses on the Multi-State Performance Test (MPT). This part of the bar tests on practical skills like drafting memos. Our students routinely report that they are extremely well prepared for the bar and this part in particular compared to students from other schools.

Barbri is the nation’s leading bar prep company, and Regent Law is pleased to partner with them. Starting with the first year of law school through graduation, our students have access to study aids—outlines, lectures, and practice problems—covering almost every subject tested on the bar exam.

Additional benefits include:

  • Discounted fee for bar prep class.
  • Bar prep class is paid throughout law school as a fee each semester and can be covered with student loans. This semester fee is in lieu of making a one-time payment of $3,000 or more at the end of law school.

All professors are assigned to serve as a mentor for students during bar preparation, and provide invaluable prayer support, encouragement, and advice.

 

  • 100% Bar Passage Rate, Honors Class of 2017
  • 100% Bar Passage Rate in 11 States, Class of 2017
  • 95% Overall Bar Passage Rate (#1 Among Virginia Law Schools), Virginia Bar Exam, July 2017
  • 86% Bar Passage Rate Nationwide, Class of 2017
  • 88% Bar Passage Rate on the Uniform Bar Exam, accepted in 26 states, Class of 2017

Christian Integration

Regent Law is committed to faith-law integration and has woven it into our curriculum. Our faculty are dedicated to Christ’s call both personally and professionally and provide a caring and nurturing environment in which students gain an understanding of the foundations of law and learn to develop the ethical and moral code required for the recognition and resolution of ethical dilemmas. Additionally, students are encouraged to explore the call of God on their lives, the gifts God has given them and discover how this translates into the practice of law.

At Regent Law, you can expect:

  • Devotions. Each class is extended 10 minutes to accommodate devotions.
  • Integration. Professors tie relevant biblical principles into class so you learn the law and analyze it from a biblical perspective.
  • Specific Classes. Foundations of Law focuses on a Christian worldview of law and Foundations of Practice helps you to explore and discern your calling.
  • Law Chapel.
  • Student and Professor Bible Studies.
  • Professor Mentorships: Each student has a faculty mentor that walks with them through law school, disciples them, and prays for them.
  • Community. The Christian community at Regent is incredible. Relationships with fellow classmates and professors are supportive instead of cutthroat. Transfer students, in particular, notice the sharp contrast between Regent and their former university. They are amazed at how kind and caring the professors are and that their fellow students are supportive instead of competitive.

Specializations

At Regent, you may use your electives and other opportunities to specialize in a particular area of law.

  • Electives. Take one or two electives in your specialized area of law.
  • Article. Draft an article/independent study on the area you want to specialize in. You’ll work under the supervision of a professor who teaches/publishes in that area. Having a published article is a definite asset to have on your resume.
  • Internships. Secure internships in the summer in that field.
  • Apprenticeships. Work in that field for up to 10 credits during your 3L year; these apprenticeships often lead to job offers.