Skip navigation

Regent Law Faculty Achievements – April 5, 2017

Regent University’s School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

Professor Craig Stern spoke at Faculty Bridges’ “Winds of Change” conference on March 4 in California on how Christian professors can affect global problems. See Professor Stern’s prior work on related matters.

Professor Lou Hensler presented his work on Natural Affections at the Religious Critiques of the Law for Pepperdine Law School’s Nootbaar Conference in March.

Associate Professor Jim Davids spoke at Regent Law’s 3rd and final Law Faculty Colloquium on March 21, presenting “Two Legal Threats to Christian Colleges and Universities – Loss of Tax Exemption and Loss of Hiring Rights.” The discussion revisited the Bob Jones University case on tax exemption to show its sharp limitations, and considered how far the religious discrimination exemption can be stretched to accommodate the needs of religious employers. On these issues, Davids has three articles forthcoming, and has previously written about related matters. A special thanks to Law Library Assistant Director Marie Summerlin Hamm and the Law Library for sponsoring these events, and for Lisa Marie Otto and her assistance in helping to make them happen.

Professor James Duane recently published “May It Please the Court: The Perils of Correcting a Justice’s Pronunciation” in the Seton Hall Circuit Review. After one week on SSRN, it has more than 200 downloads.

Law Library Assistant Director Marie Summerlin Hamm recently published a piece titled “Preparing for the Battlefield and Avoiding the War: Recently Released Construction Litigation Resources” in the Virginia Lawyer. This is her seventh contribution to the annual Construction Law & Public Contracts Section-focused issue. She has previously written on related matters. And, on March 31, she presented “Where the Rubric Meets the Road: Assessing Legal Research and Writing Competency Across the Curriculum” at the Southeastern Association of Law Libraries annual meeting in Raleigh, NC.

Marie Summerlin Hamm, assistant director of the Regent University Law Library, has been appointed co-chair of the Virginia Association of Law Libraries Publications Committee. Her duties include soliciting and editing contributions for the recurring Law Libraries column in Virginia Lawyer.

Professor Ben Madison presented at Educating Tomorrow’s Lawyers at the Ignite presentations given at this year’s annual meeting. View his presentation. Madison and Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm had a proposal entitled “The heart of ABA 302: Teaching millennials law with moral formation,” which he will present on July 6-8 at the Institute for Law Teaching and Learning (ITL), University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law’s Conference, “Teaching Cultural Competency and Other Professional Skills.”

Program Director Janis Kirkland has just published two short articles on environmental law matters including “Multi-million Dollar Lawsuit Filed By State Levee Board for Ecological Damage Allegedly Caused By Oil and Gas Companies Fails Due to Failure To Show Duty to Local Municipality and Lack of Specific Pleading” (summary of Board of Commissioners v. Tennessee Gas Pipeline Co., No. 15-30162 (5th Cir. Mar. 3, 2017) – published in both Chemical Waste Litigation Reporter, Vol. 73, beginning at page 13 (Mar. 2017) & EPA Administrative Law Reporter, Vol. 49, beginning at page 14 (Mar. 2017). She has also published “Court Forces EPA to Undertake Nondiscretionary Duty To Approve or Disapprove State’s Refusal to Develop Biologic TMDLs for Biologically Impaired Waters” (summary of Ohio Valley Environmental Coal, Inc. v. McCarthy, No. 3:15-0271 (S.D. W. Va. Feb. 14, 2017) – published in EPA Administrative Law Reporter, Vol. 49, beginning at page 35 (February & March 2017).

Associate Professor Gloria Whittico has again been invited to present her research on Freedom Suits at the National Underground Railroad Conference in Washington, D.C. in May. View her previous publications.

The Regent University College Student Leadership Board is putting on a Pro Life Panel tonight, April 5th in the Library Auditorium from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. where Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm will be a panelist and largely present Part III “Roe’s Effects on Sexuality and Romance,” from this article.

Associate Professor Brad Jacob spoke on constitutional matters on “Let’s Talk With Mark Elfstrand” (www.1160hope.com).

Several Regent Law faculty and alumni have appeared on Mauck & Baker’s “Lawyers for Jesus” radio show in Chicago with Noel Sterett.

Regent Law Faculty Achievements – January 19, 2017

Regent University’s School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

Law Library Assistant Director Marie Summerlin Hamm’s Book Review “Stop Telling and Start Showing: Show, Don’t Tell: Legal Writing for the Real World by Adam Lamparello & Megan E. Boyd,” was recently listed on SSRN’s Top Ten download list for:

  • LSN: Book Reviews (Sub-Topic)
  • LSN: Practice of Law Librarianship (Topic)
  • RCRN: Writing Across the Curriculum (Topic)
  • Rhetoric Educator: Communication, Composition, Rhetoric, & Writing eJournal.

She also did a review of The Complete Legal Writer (Carolina Academic Press), published in 108 Law Lib. J. 660 (Fall 2016). The book, written by a couple of legal writing professors at UNC, explains their unique “genre discovery” approach to teaching legal writing. The authors were so pleased with her review, that one blogged about it – Katie Rose Guest Pyral, one of the authors, posted a response to the book review on her blog.

Director Janis Kirkland has recently published several case summaries in several journals including the EPA Administrative Law Reporter, the Securities Reform Act Litigation Reporter, Bank & Corporate Governance Law Reporter, the RICO & Securities Fraud Law Reporter, the EPA Administrative Law Reporter, the Chemical Waste Litigation Reporter, and the Securities Reform Act Litigation Reporter.

Assistant Director Hamm and Director Kirkland, and Assistant Dean Kimberly Van Essendelft presented at the Legal Writing Institute’s One-Day Workshop at Wake Forest in December. The assistant director of that LAWR program sent Dean Hernandez a letter praising their work.

Associate Dean Natt Gantt and Professor Ben Madison’s paper, “Is There a Paradox Between Ethics and Happiness? Moral Formation for Lawyers,” was recently listed on SSRN’s Top Ten download list for: LSN: Law Firms/Legal Practice (Topic).

Professor Eric DeGroff’s book chapter, “Access to Information: international perspective,” has just been published in Decision Making in Environmental Law, by Paddock, Glicksman, & Bryner. The book is one volume of a two-volume encyclopedia covering environmental regulation and the environmental decision making process in the United States and internationally.

Carol Daugherty Rasnic, one of our fall adjunct professors, published “What the German Bundestag might have learned from the U.S. Congress on workers’ right to strike.”

Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm’s piece co-authored with Sandra Alcaide (’16) “Obergefell: A Game-changer for Women,” was recently listed on SSRN’s Top Ten download list for: Sexuality & the Law eJournal, among others.

Professor Craig Stern’s downloads on SSRN have now eclipsed 1,550, led by “The Heart of Mens Rea and the Insanity of Psychopaths.

Distinguished Professor Harry Hutchison’s downloads are about to hit 4,100. View his work.

Professor James Duane’s downloads are nearly at 2,650, led by “The Right to Remain Silent: A New Answer to an Old Question” which has 1,239 downloads after being posted for just eight months.

Regent Law Faculty Achievements – Week of September 12, 2016

Regent University’s School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

Associate Professor Jim Davids’ article “Religious Colleges’ Employment Rights Under the ‘Ministerial Exception’ and When Disciplining an Employee for Sexually Related Conduct” was solicited, offered, and accepted by the Texas Journal of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights for publication.

Associate Professor Jim Davids and Assistant Professor Tessa Dysart, moderated by Associate Dean Natt Gantt, spoke at Constitution Day today, sponsored by the Regent Law Chapter of the Federalist Society.

Associate Professor Brad Jacob’s Federalist Society talks coming up this fall include:

  • Oct. 26 – University of Chicago Law School – The Unintended Consequences of the 17th Amendment
  • Oct. 27 – Chicago-Kent Law School – Religious Liberty in the “Lobbying Nineties” and Today
  • Nov. 10 – University of Baltimore School of Law – The Unintended Consequences of the 17th Amendment

Professor Eric DeGroff co-chairs the Law School Committee of the 2016-2017 ABA DR Section Leadership on Dispute Resolution.

Dean Michael Hernandez’s paper, “The Rule of Law, Historical Equity, and Mexican Contra Prohibition Immigrants” was recently listed on SSRN’s Top Ten download list for: SIRN: Federal-State Relationship (Sub-Topic). As of 11 September 2016, it had been downloaded 33 times.

Professor James Duane has had several recent invitations to speak, which include:

  • Cornell Law School, Ithaca, NY, Fifth Amendment, October 2016
  • Indigent Defense Training Commission, keynote speaker, Richmond, VA on Wednesday, May 3, 2017
  • Norfolk Portsmouth Bar Association Speaker Series, Norfolk, VA, Winter 2017

Professor Duane was also recently interviewed and quoted about his latest book, You Have the Right to Remain Innocent, in a Sinclair News Group syndicated article that is now available on multiple news sites.

Regent Law Faculty Achievements – Week of September 3, 2016

Regent University’s School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. They have been busy this past summer. Here’s a brief update on some of their scholarly activities.

Associate Professor Gloria Whittico was part of a panel in May with the National Consortium on Racial and Ethnic Fairness in Courts. She also presented her freedom suits talk at the National Underground Railroad conference held in Hilton Head, SC. Her work was very well-received. That talk was largely derived from her work at “‘A Woman’s Pride and a Mother’s Love’ the Missouri Freedom Suits and the Lengths and Limits of Justice” and “‘If Past Is Prologue’: Toward the Development of a New ‘Freedom Suit’ for the Remediation of Foster Care Disproportionalities Among African-American Children.”

Associate Professor Whittico also traveled to Drake Law School in early July to conduct a four-day workshop for 20 students who will be starting law school this fall at Drake, Mitchell-Hamlin, Idaho, and Vermont law schools. They are a part of a new Council on Education Opportunity, Inc., an initiative designed to assist under-represented students succeed in law school.

Associate Professor Jim Davids received an offer from the Journal of Church & State for publication of his article entitled “Are Religious Institutions that Resist Obergefell and Sexual Orientation/Gender Identity Laws in Danger of Losing Their Tax Exempt Status? Bob Jones University Revisited.” He accepted that offer for fall publication.

Assistant Professor Tessa Dysart traveled to Charlotte, NC and Montgomery, AL to speak to two Federalist Society Lawyers Chapters on human trafficking. Her presentations there were largely derived from “The Protected Innocence Initiative: Building Protective State Law Regimes for America’s Sex-Trafficked Children” and “Child, Victim, or Prostitute? Justice Through Immunity for Prostituted Children.” During these travels she met with several alumni and judges, making some great connections for law student internships and other employment. Many were also interested in her assistance with improving their state’s trafficking law. Assistant Professor Dysart also participated in several panels at SEALS in August. Additionally, she is now the managing editor of the Appellate Advocacy Blog on the Law Prof Blog network.

Professor James Duane will present on September 29 a book forum at the Cato Institute on his new book You Have the Right to Remain Innocent. He’ll be addressing university students, faculty, staffers from Capitol Hill, attorneys, journalists, and analysts from other think tanks. C-Span may live stream the event. Then he’ll fly back to Virginia Beach to present the next day at the RALS conference his latest scholarship entitled “The Day the Supreme Court Almost Outlawed Religious Discrimination in Jury Selection.” Professor Duane also participated in several panels at SEALS in August.

Professor Ben Madison completed a new chapter in “Appellate Practice — Virginia and Federal Courts” by Virginia CLE Publications. His chapter is entitled “Appeals to the Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court of Virginia at page 2.0.” Professor Madison also made several important presentations at SEALS in August and will be presenting “Is There a Paradox between Ethics & Happiness? Moral Formation for Lawyers” at the RALS Conference here on Sept. 30.

Law Library Assistant Director Marie Hamm wrote and published the following book reviews over the summer:

  • 108 LAW LIBRARY JOURNAL (Summer 2016) (reviewing Alexa Z. Chew & Katie Rose Guest Pryal, The Complete Legal Writer (2015).
  • Stop Telling and Start Showing, 13 Legal Communication & Rhetoric: JALWD (Journal of the Association of Legal Writing Directors) (Winter 2016) (reviewing Adam Lamparello and Megan E. Boyd, Show, Don’t Tell: Legal Writing for the Real World (2014).

She is also writing a book chapter for the next edition of “A Guide to Legal Research in Virginia.” Publication is scheduled for March 2017.

Over the summer many Regent Law faculty experienced numerous downloads of their work, and had several publications listed on SSRN Top Ten lists. View the scholarship of all Regent Law faculty authors.

That’s a lot of influence in the direction of the law!

Regent Law has a great line-up of guests, speakers, panelists, and attendees for our hosting of the 2016 Conference of Religiously Affiliated Law Schools (RALS) on September 29-30 here on campus. The focus of the conference will be the challenges and opportunities facing faith-based law schools, and many of our Regent Law faculty are participating in important ways in that conference. There is still time for faculty members from other law schools to register.

Associate Dean Gantt Featured as August Harvey Fellow

 L.O. Natt Gantt, II Professor and Associate Dean, Regent University School of Law

L.O. Natt Gantt, II
Professor & Associate Dean, Regent University School of Law

The Harvey Fellows Program provides scholarships to Christian students who are pursuing graduate studies at premier universities in fields considered to be underrepresented by Christians and who possess a unique vision to impact society through their vocations.

Initiated by the Mustard Seed Foundation (MSF) in 1992, the Harvey Fellows Program seeks to mark, equip and encourage individuals to actively integrate their faith and vocation as leaders in strategic occupations. Through the program, the Foundation seeks to identify, prepare, and celebrate this generation’s Daniels, Esthers, Josephs and Lydias – people of God willing and able to assume positions of leadership and influence for the cause of Christ in fields such as media, government, scientific research, industry, the arts, and higher education.

Harvey Fellows come from around the globe and work in diverse fields. Currently there are over 300 Harvey Fellows worldwide, representing twenty-four countries and over forty academic and vocational fields. Click here for a listing of all current and senior Harvey Fellows by field of study.

The following is from the Harvey Fellows Quarterly August 2016 newsletter, which features Professor and Associate Dean Natt Gantt. Dean Gantt received a Harvey Fellowship in 1993 to help fund his studies at Harvard Law School:

 

Sara VanderHaagen, HFAB Communications Chair: How would you described your vocation, and how are you pursuing that in your current position?

Natt Gantt: I always have had a heart to see people’s lives transformed by the power of God. Lawyers often face significant ethical dilemmas in the profession, so it is enormously enriching to teach at a Christian law school where I can inspire my students to develop a biblical framework for ethical decision-making. In teaching legal ethics and my other courses, I also challenge my students to be “salt and light” in the legal profession. Furthermore, it is incredibly rewarding to write, speak, and engage the legal academy and profession in ways that motivate us to develop lawyers of character and integrity.

 

SV: How has being a Harvey Fellow affected your vocation and life?

NG: Receiving the Harvey Fellowship was a blessing that furthered my desire to integrate my faith into my professional calling. Since receiving the fellowship many years ago, I have been inspired and encouraged in my own work as I see all the amazingly gifted applicants who have received fellowships over the years and are making a kingdom impact in their respective fields.

SV: What about your work most excites or inspires you right now?

NG: Legal education right now is in the midst of tremendous change, and one of the current pressures on legal educators is that we have to do a better job helping our students develop their professional identity. This pressure creates an exciting opportunity for Christian law professors, as we can discuss with the broader academy and profession the importance of cultivating values and encouraging moral formation in law students and young lawyers.

SV: What about God’s work most excites or inspires you right now?

NG: In interacting with my students and Regent colleagues and with lawyers and professors from other institutions, I am continually inspired to see how God impacts the lives of others–many times in environments where I don’t expect it. We indeed put Him in a box when we overlook how He can touch the lives of others in “secular” professions.

Dean Hernandez Featured in Legal Blog

Dean Michael V. Hernandez
Dean Michael V. Hernandez

Regent Law Dean Michael Hernandez has been featured in the Oklahoma Legal Group Blog’s series highlighting law school deans across the country. The full text of his interview with Adam Banner is reprinted below with permission.

Regent University School of Law in Virginia Beach, Virginia, was established in 1986, and in just 30 short years, has grown to be recognized as having a faculty ranked among the top 10 American law school faculties. Regent Law is unique in providing a legal education with a Christian perspective, and its Honors Program boasts a 92.3 percent first-time bar passage rate. Its moot court program ranks 5th in the nation, and in 2015, Regent Law ranked in the top 25 percent of all law schools for graduates obtaining judicial clerkships.

In 1992, Michael V. Hernandez joined the faculty at Regent Law, where he has taught courses including Appellate Advocacy, Advanced Appellate Advocacy, Christian Foundations of Law, International Human Rights, Property, and Race & the Law. He served as the director of the LL.M. in American Legal Studies degree program, the director of the Honors Program, faculty advisor to the Moot Court Board and to the Hispanic Law Students Association, and as the head coach of Regent’s award-winning Moot Court teams prior to becoming Dean of Regent University School of Law in 2015.

As Dean, he works with a distinguished and nationally-recognized law faculty that includes includes former United States Attorney General John Ashcroft and the Chief Counsel of the American Center for Law and Justice, Dr. Jay Sekulow.

As part of our continuing Law Deans series, we asked Dean Hernandez for his perspective and insight into legal education and the changing face of the legal profession.

What is the biggest challenge facing new law students?

I understand this question in two ways. Regarding the adjustment to law school, the first year traditionally has been, and remains, the most difficult academic experience for the majority of students. At all law schools, the challenge involves learning how to engage and master the law analytically and strategically—to “think like a lawyer.” At Regent, we challenge our students to develop these analytical skills without losing, and indeed while strengthening, their moral compass. Regarding the unique challenges law students face today, the legal education and job markets are in flux, facing typical modern economic disruptions. The challenge for all new law students will be to develop the substantive knowledge and analytical and practical skills necessary to be excellent attorneys while also being equipped to thrive in the modern economy.

What is the single biggest challenge that you face as Dean?

Maintaining and building Regent Law’s distinctive Christian mission and commitment to academic excellence while adapting to the disrupted legal education and job markets.

Which areas of the law do you think will experience the biggest growth over the next few years?

In terms of practice growth, the intersection of technology and the law—computer law, cybersecurity, and related fields. In terms of substantive prominence, religious liberty issues. Fundamental challenges to the principles of freedom upon which this nation was founded and the theological and jurisprudential presuppositions upon which those principles were established are on the immediate horizon and will be at the forefront of upcoming legal disputes.

Is teaching law now different compared to when you were a law student?

Yes and no. Aspects of excellent law teaching—inspiring students to dig deep, develop analytical skills, and master material with guidance from, rather than complete dependence on, the instructor—are timeless, and the essential art of learning the law has not changed. However, technology has profoundly impacted education. The current generation of students is much more visually oriented and spatially aware—but also potentially distracted—than earlier generations were. Like most attributes, these are both strengths and weaknesses. In living out the Golden Rule, we must balance challenging students to grow while we enter their world; in other words, we must develop their skills and play to their strengths but not cater to their weaknesses.

How do you think technology will impact criminal defense?

Technology already has profoundly impacted criminal law in both good and bad ways. Improved technology has increased the certainty of guilt and exonerated the innocent. Technological advances will continue to have this positive impact. On the negative side, jurors often have unrealistic expectations of the availability of definitive scientific evidence and thus the ability of the prosecution to pinpoint guilt. This “CSI effect” arguably has created a de facto “beyond any doubt” standard in many criminal cases. Although that heightened standard will lead to fewer improper convictions, it is unworkable in an imperfect world and will also lead to the exoneration of many culprits who should be convicted.

What do you think are the biggest legal challenges facing the Supreme Court?

The most important legal challenge will be, as I noted above, determining whether to maintain an unshakable commitment to the principles of freedom, most notably religious liberty, upon which this nation was founded. The Court’s biggest general challenge will be to maintain its legitimacy while properly and fairly adjudicating disputes in a non-political way. The Court usually meets this standard but often fails to do so in highly publicized cases. The Constitution does not establish a federal judiciary of general jurisdiction, and thus the Supreme Court is not the highest court in the land on all legal issues. Instead, the federal government, including the federal judiciary, has limited, specified supreme powers, with most matters left to state and local authorities and tribunals. Many justices, on both the right and left, adjudicate disputes as if they had comprehensive common law authority, leaving our nation governed by the dictates of five unelected and largely unaccountable individuals. This approach is antithetical to the representative and balanced form of government our Constitution establishes and the principle of subsidiarity essential to liberty and good governance.

Are there any aspects of practicing law you miss due to being in education?

I litigated for five years before I joined the faculty at Regent Law. I miss the challenge and thrill of strategizing and crafting legal arguments on behalf of real clients. I have, however, been able to put those skills to good use, both as Dean and also previously through my work with our moot court program, which I am pleased to note ranked fifth among all U.S. law schools in 2015-16.

If you could invite any three legal or governmental identities (living or dead, real or fictitious) to a meal, whom would you invite?

Moses, James Madison, and Thomas Jefferson. Moses because he was the first “law giver” and judge, his personal story is fascinating, and I would enjoy discussing the substance and modern significance of principles embedded in the Decalogue and the Torah. James Madison, because he was the primary drafter of our Constitution, a brilliant legal mind, and the preeminent defender of religious liberty in our nation, if not in all human history. Thomas Jefferson, because I am a “double ‘Hoo” (B.A. and J.A., University of Virginia), and I would like to discuss his views of federalism and the metaphorical “wall” he employed in his letter to the Danbury Baptists. (Dr. Dan Dreisbach has demonstrated from detailed and scholarly historical analysis that Mr. Jefferson meant the wall to protect the church from the state, not the public square from religious influences.)

What is your favorite legal movie?

For me, this is the most difficult question you have asked, because I am not a movie aficionado, and I tend to be distracted by unrealistic movie court scenes, which are unfortunately quite common. The most iconic movie courtroom scene is Tom Cruise confronting Jack Nicholson in A Few Good Men. The most fun movie that includes an important courtroom scene is Miracle on 34th Street (1947 version, of course). The most important legal movie is To Kill A Mockingbird.

Regent Law Faculty Achievements – Week of June 7, 2016

Regent University’s School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

Associate Professor Jim Davids gave several lectures in Ukraine from April 19-26 including:

  • Christian View of Government, Class Lecture to law students at University Shevchenko, Kyiv, Ukraine, April 19, 2016
  • Christian View of Government, Class Lecture to law students at University Shevchenko, Kyiv, Ukraine, April 20, 2016
  • Christian View of Government, Class Lecture to law students at National Academy for Public Administration, Kyiv, Ukraine, April 20, 2016
  • Christian View of Government, Lecture to law faculty and students at Conference held at University Shevchenko, Kyiv, Ukraine, April 20, 2016
  • Christian View of Government, Lecture to law students at University Dragomanova, Kyiv, Ukraine, April 20, 2016
  • Christian View of Law, Lecture to law students and law professors at Student Summit, Dnepropetrovsk State University of Internal Affairs, Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine, April 21, 2016
  • Christian View of Government, Class Lecture to law students at East European University, Cherkassy, Ukraine, April 23, 2016
  • Christian View of Government, Presentation at Morality and Power in the Context of Constitutional Reform Conference at East European University, Cherkassy, Ukraine, April 23, 2016
  • Christian View of Government, Lecture to law faculty and students at National Aviation University, Kyiv, Ukraine, April 20, 2016
  • Christian View of Law, Lecture to law faculty and students at Spirit and Letter of Law Conference held at Linguistic University, Kyiv, Ukraine, April 25, 2016
  • Christian View of Government, Lecture to law students and faculty at Conference on Legal-Social Problems at the National State Tax Service University of Ukraine, April 26, 2016
  • Two Worldviews and Two Revolutions: Comparing the American and French Revolutions, Lecture to law students and faculty at National State Tax Service University of Ukraine, April 26, 2016

Associate Professor Davids was also quoted in an article in the Ukraine on Christian Worldview. Read the article. He has sent out 2 articles for publication as well.

Associate Dean Lynn Marie Kohm and LAW alumna Kathleen Knudsen presented “Would Jane Austen be on eHarmony” at the International Society for Family Law North American Conference last week in Moran, Wyoming. You may download it at Would Jane Austen Be on eHarmony? How Changes in Women’s Legal Status Have Influenced the Choice of a Spouse.

Associate Dean Lynn Marie Kohm’s papers on SSRN have just gone over 3400 downloads. Follow her work here.

Associate Professor Kathleen McKee’s SSRN downloads are approaching 300. In addition to her article, “A Primer on International Parental Abduction,” she also has some newly posted scholarship on SSRN including:


Download these and look for her article, “The United States’ Response to Human Trafficking: Sword of Justice or Paper Tiger,” also soon to be posted on SSRN for download.

Assistant Professor Tessa Dysart’s article, “The Protected Innocence Initiative: Building Protective State Law Regimes for America’s Sex-Trafficked Children,” just went over 200 downloads.

The University of Denver just released the Annual Report of 10 years of the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System (IAALS), where Associate Dean Ben Madison is listed as a Fellow in Educating Tomorrow’s Lawyers (and you can see it at page 20 in this report and Regent’s membership is also listed at page 17). His SSRN downloads include a great deal of his work as a Fellow and recently went over 500 for the year, and are approaching 2000 all time. Follow his work here. And you can see Professor Natt Gantt on the ETL website as well as here.

Professor Tom Folsom’s reach on SSRN is about to extend to 1400 downloads. Follow his work here. His reach on bepress is even greater, follow him here.

Professor Craig Stern is approaching 1300 downloads. Follow his work here.

Many of the Regent Law faculty are presenting on panels at the Southeast Association of Law Schools (SEALS) Conference in early August, including Associate Dean Ben Madison, Professor Tom Folsom, Assistant Professor Tessa Dysart and Associate Dean Lynn Marie Kohm.

Regent University School of Law will host the 2016 Conference of Religiously Affiliated Law Schools (RALS) on September 29-30 here on campus. The focus of the conference will be the challenges and opportunities facing faith based or religiously affiliated law schools in the 21st century.

Regent Law Faculty Achievements – Week of April 25

Regent University’s School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

Professor Eric DeGroff attended and presented at the Representation in Mediation Competition Conference, spending the first two days of his time at the conference in New York last week helping to run this competition. He was also appointed to serve as the lead co-chair for this ABA committee throughout the next year. On the final day of the conference, Proffesor DeGroff presented on a panel for a CLE program at the Legal Educators’ Colloquium. To learn more about his research in this area, see his most downloaded article: Training Tomorrow’s Lawyers: What Empirical Research Can Tell Us About the Effect of Law School Pedagogy on Law Student Learning Styles.

Professor Tom Folsom presented and participated in a debate at Faulkner Law School, on April 14, on the topic “Designing New Law for a Coded World—Whether, When, and How (Easterbrook’s ‘Law of the Horse’ 20 years after).” View some of his work here.

Professor James Duane’s book “You have the Right to Remain Innocent” is #1 again on Amazon. Professor Duane also presented this week at Stanford Law’s Symposium entitled “Cutting Edge Issues in Criminal Justice,” where he had his own panel.

The paper, Empowering Love and Respect for Child Offenders through Therapeutic Jurisprudence: The Teen Courts Example that Alison Haefner and Associate Dean Lynn Marie Kohm have published in an online international journal at Sociology and Anthropology 4(4): 212-221 (2016), was featured on Law Professors TypePad’s CrimProfBlog.

Center for Global Justice Administrative Director Ernie Walton is attending a conference called Faith and Law Around the Globe (FLAG) sponsored by CRU (Campus Crusade for Christ) in South Africa, which will run April 20-27. See him on Twitter with other attorneys at the conference.

In light of this week’s events at the Supreme Court of the United States, you may want to read Associate Professor Jim Boland’s piece Is Free Speech Compatible with Human Dignity, Equality, and Democratic Government: America, a Free Speech Island in a Sea of Censorship?

Regent Law Faculty Achievements – Week of March 7, 2016

Regent University’s School of Law Faculty members willingly share their knowledge and expertise beyond the classroom to spark scholarly debate and advance the practice of law. Their latest endeavors include the following.

Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm and Associate Professor Kathleen McKee presented “Examining the Associations between Sustainable Development Population Policies and Human Trafficking” at the Christopher Newport University Conference on the Global Status of Women and Girls. Visit the Regent Law Family Restoration blog for a review of their presentation and a photo of them with the wife of CNU’s president, Rosemary Trible, who is also President of Fear2Freedom.

Professor Natt Gantt and Associate Professor Gloria Whittico will be presenting their proposal “Improving Summer Start and ASP Orientation Programming in Light of Changes in Entering Student Profiles” at the 2016 AASE Conference.

Associate Professor Brad Jacob has had several TV and radio interviews regarding Justice Antonin Scalia. View his TV interviews at the following links:

WAVY TV | WTKR TV | CBN NEWS

Associate Dean Lynne Marie Kohm and Professor Natt Gantt will be presenting at Pepperdine’s Annual Nootbar Conference, “Teaching Millennials Law.” Their presentation will be based on an appreciation of justice in the context of instruction in professional responsibility (as previously set out at The Emperor Has No Clothes, But Does Anyone Really Care? How Law Schools are Failing to Develop Students’ Professional Identity and Practical Judgment) and family law (with state costs of family breakdown previously set out in A Fifty-State Survey of the Cost of Family Fragmentation), examining the problem of moral formation in the context of a millennium generation of law students.