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Editorial Style Guide

Last updated: May 2008

G

GI Bill®

Capitalize both words and do not use periods within GI. (This is an exception to the general rule for two-letter abbreviations.)

Gospel

Do not capitalize the word gospel in a general reference. But do capitalize it when referring to the books of the Bible.


Examples:

He wants to share the gospel.
The topic was the Gospel of John.


Grade Point Average

The acronym of grade point average, GPA, should be used only after the initial use of the full title. The acronym does not need periods. Note that the use of GPA is more familiar to students than spelling out the entire term. Also, the acronym UGPA should not be used; instead use undergraduate GPA.

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H


Hyphens

Hyphens are used to avoid ambiguity, or to form a single idea from two or more words. For complete guidelines, check the AP Stylebook. The following are Regent-specific uses of hyphens.

When hyphenating words within a headline or subheading, words on both sides of the hyphen may be capitalized. However, in body copy, only the first word should be capitalized.

Examples:

State-Accredited Program Receives Award (headline)
Web-based learning is a growing trend. (sentence)


It is not necessary to hyphenate the phrases nationally accredited or fully accredited.

Generally, the rule is if the first word in the phrase ends in ly, then it should not be hyphenated with the word that follows.


When using the phrase state accredited, hyphenate only if the two words together are used to modify a noun and precede a noun. If they follow the noun, do not hyphenate.


Examples:

The state-accredited program is evaluated frequently.
The degree is state accredited.


Do not hyphenate joint degrees.


Hyphenate credit hour only if the two words together are used to modify a noun, such as program in the instance below.


Example:

This is a 31-credit-hour program.


The phrases pro-life and pro-choice are generally hyphenated.


Hyphenate words beginning with the prefix co in order to avoid ambiguity.


Example:

My co-worker suggested this restaurant.
I am the co-author of more than 20 journal articles.

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I


Initials

Names with two adjacent initials should have no space between them in order to prevent them from being placed on two lines of type setting.


Examples:

T.S. Elliot
Dr. M.G. “Pat” Robertson


Abbreviations using only the initials of a name do not need periods.


Examples:

JFK
LBJ

 

Internet

(See also Net)
Capitalize the word Internet in a sentence and as a heading.


Italics

Unlike Modern Language Association (MLA) and American Psychological Association (APA) styles, the Regent style (following Gregg guidelines) employs italics when referring to book titles, movie titles, play titles, song titles, newspaper titles, television program titles (this does not include television stations), and works of art. Articles, speech titles, sermon titles and lecture titles should be put in quotation marks.


Examples:

I just read Of Mice and Men.
He chose to watch CBS Evening News.
John’s seminar was titled “How Children See God.”
Soltor’s sculpture Relentless is on display.
Evans’ article “Go in Peace or in Pieces” was published in The Herald.

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J


Joint degrees

When referring to the joint degrees program, the phrase joint degrees is always plural because the student earns two degrees. (Do not hyphenate joint degrees.)


Example:

She has chosen a joint degrees program in public policy and journalism.

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K


Kingdom of God

Do not capitalize the word kingdom in the phrases kingdom of God and God’s kingdom.

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L


Libraries

Regent University has two separate libraries. Use University Library when referring to the general collections library. Use Law Library when referring to the collection of law materials. When referring to the library system as a whole, use Regent University Libraries. Do not capitalize library when used by itself.

 


"GI Bill®" is a registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). More information about education benefits offered by VA is available at the official U.S. government website at www.benefits.va.gov/gibill.

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