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Editorial Style Guide

Last updated: May 2008

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Abbreviations

Regent University: Do not abbreviate Regent University unless absolutely necessary. If it is necessary to abbreviate, use Rgnt. Univ. The word Regent may also be used by itself.
Certain abbreviations (of three or more letters) commonly used in Regent University publications are written without periods between the letters: ASAP, GRE, GMAT, LSAT, MBA, MFA, MPA, MIT, CAGS and GPA.


Acronyms

Before using an acronym or other abbreviation, spell out the entire phrase with the abbreviation following in parentheses. Subsequent references may be made using only the acronym. However, if the acronym is at a beginning at a sentence, it should be spelled out.


Examples:

She took the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) as scheduled. The GRE was challenging.
Graduate Record Exams scores are to be sent to Regent University.


A way to avoid having to spell out the acronym is to rework the sentence.


Example:

Send GRE scores to Regent University.


Accreditation

When referring to the overall accreditation of Regent University by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), the following statement was formulated by SACS and MUST BE USED IN ITS ENTIRETY and without changes:


Regent University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award associates, baccalaureate, masters, and doctorate degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404.679.4500 for questions about the accreditation of Regent University.

These statements referring to additional approvals and accreditations may be added to the SACS accreditation when appropriate:

The Academy of Strategic and Entrepreneurial Leadership accredits the Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership, Master of Arts in Strategic Foresight, Doctor of Philosophy in Organizational Leadership and the Doctor of Strategic Leadership bestowed by the School of Business & Leadership.

The following business program at Regent University is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP): Master of Business Administration.

The American Bar Association (ABA) fully approves the School of Law.

The School of Divinity is accredited by the Association of Theological Schools (ATS).


The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Eduction Accreditation (CHEA), has accredited until 2016 the following programs in the School of Psychology & Counseling: Master of Arts in Community Counseling, Master of Arts in School Counseling, Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling, Master of Arts in School Counseling (online), and PhD in Counselor Education & Supervision.


The Commission on Accreditation (CoA) of the American Psychological Association (APA), accredits the doctoral program in clinical psychology of the School of Psychology & Counseling.

The Teacher Education Accreditation Council accredits the School of Education's educational leadership and teacher preparation programs and the College of Arts & Sciences interdisciplinary studies program, which are designed to prepare competent, caring, and qualified professional educators, for a period of seven years, from January 9, 2009 to January 9, 2016.

Regent University's Robertson School of Government is a member of the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA).

 

Acting Dean

When referring to the position of acting dean, capitalization is not necessary unless immediately preceding the name of the individual, in which case only the word Dean is capitalized.


Examples:

The announcement was made by acting Dean Jane Briley.
The announcement was made by Jane Briley, acting dean.


A.D., B.C.

The rules for using A.D. (anno Domini, year of our Lord) and B.C. (before Christ) are not the same.

The rule for A.D.

Because the full phrase should read in the year of our Lord 1996, the abbreviation goes before the figure for the year: A.D. 1996.


The rule for B.C.

Because the full phrase should read in the year 500 before Christ, the abbreviation goes after the figure for the year: 500 B.C.


Ages

Use figures at all times to describe a person's age, even if the age is a single digit. Ages expressed as adjectives before a noun or as substitutes for a noun use hyphens.


Examples:

Todd is 3 years old.
I met 3-year-old Todd.
David is in his 30s. (no apostrophe)


Alumni

Use the word alumni when referring to a group of men and women who have attended the school. Use the word alumnus (alumni in the plural) when referring to a man (or men) who attended the school. Use alumna (alumnae in the plural) for similar references to a woman.


a.m., p.m.

Always use lowercase letters with periods and no space.


Ampersands (&)

When referring to university courses, programs and schools, use an ampersand (&) rather than and.


Examples:

The School of Divinity is offering a new course called Life Principles & Values.
The School of Psychology & Counseling offers the Doctoral Program in Counselor Education & Supervision.


Apostrophes

An apostrophe is used to show possession and also to indicate missing letters or numerals.


Examples:

Regent’s faculty is among the nation’s finest.
The ’90s will be a decade of change and challenge.


An apostrophe is not used to make a year plural.


Examples:

The 1990s will be a decade of promise.


An apostrophe should be used to make single letters plural.


Examples:

She expected to receive A’s and B’s.


One does not use an apostrophe for plurals of multiple-letter combinations or numerals. Use an apostrophe in plural versions of degrees (M.A.s, MBAs, Ph.D.s).


Examples:

The young students practiced their ABCs.
Thousands of TVs were tuned in to the program.
He would have two MBAs if he could.


When using an apostrophe to replace the first two numerals in a year, the apostrophe goes before and faces away from the remaining numerals.


Examples:

He called the ’60s his decade.


Use an apostrophe in the names of academic degrees: associate’s degree, bachelor’s degree, master’s degree.


Asterisks

When asterisks are used for notation, the following placement should be used:


Example:

The College of Communication & the Arts also offers the Master of Arts (M.A.) in Journalism* and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.).
*Some tracks available online.


Please note that the asterisk comes after the punctuation mark, if one is used.


Example:

The College of Arts & Sciences offers the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Organizational Leadership & Management,* and is scheduled to begin in the spring semester of next year.**
*Offered on campus only.
**Pending SACS accreditation.

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