Clubs to Fit Anyone’s Interests

From government to film-making, from business to dance, Regent University has clubs to fit anyone’s interests. After the annual Founders Chapel on Wednesday, August 24, the Student Activity Board (SAB) greeted undergraduate students to show them what clubs, organizations and ministries Regent offers.

“One thing that is great about Regent is that they encourage student leadership,” said Sean Moore, SAB vice president. “That’s one thing I love about Regent. Almost any student can find an organization where they can truly be a leader and get that leadership potential to do what the school says, which is Christian leadership to change the world.”

Moore describes his job as making student life as enjoyable as possible. The organization plans and hosts small events like parties at the Ordinary, and large events like the annual Campus Game Week, where students compete for cash, and the annual Christmas Ball that draws about 1,000 students.

“God has been a huge part of dance, and it’s a huge form of worship for me,” said Shawna Kelly, Regent Contemporary Dance Club member. “It’s a fun way to express myself and a fun way to meet other people and do something physical as well.”

Regent’s Contemporary Dance Club brings together students who are experienced dancers for practice each week. They perform at the Christmas Ball, Unchapel and other events. The club joined others at the fair to attract new students who have dancing skills. Some clubs sought to challenge students to develop new skills.

“What we do is try to help students have real world opportunities that they can put on their resumes later and help them get jobs,” said Austin Risner, Enactus member.

Enactus takes on several entrepreneurial projects throughout the year, using business to improve the lives of others, and presenting team accomplishments at year-end competitions. Projects last year included boosting Regent Ordinary’s sales by improving its offerings, and partnering with a microfinance organization to provide loans to families in Uganda to purchase vehicles, making them mobile and broadening their business opportunities.

“It allows you to get a taste of what you want to be doing after you graduate, and, no matter what kind of field you are going into, it really gives you the skills that are going to be important in your job later,” said Risner. “Whether you’re majoring in cinema-television, communications or business, you’re going to need to know how to work for a team.”

“Being part of RUDA has really pushed me to grow in my confidence in public speaking,” said Lexie Cross, Regent Undergraduate Debate Association (RUDA) member.

Cross, a business major, found herself growing in confidence and articulating her thoughts by joining the Regent Undergraduate Debate Association.

“It is basically a law/debate team where we take a case, and we act as though we are arguing it before the Supreme Court,” said Cross. “We work in partnerships and have many different teams we send to regionals. Last year Regent swept regionals, winning first, second and third place here, and sent four teams to nationals in California.”

While each club seeks to achieve a unique goal, Josh Olson, with the new documentary club, sums up the one common quality each club strives after.

“We’re looking for anyone who is willing to use their gifts to spread the kingdom of God,” said Olson.

Learn more about SAB.