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Program Quick Facts

Available On Campus

New Section:
October 9, 2014
5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

CLEs:
Indivivdual Course: 1 CLE

Price:
Individual Course: $29

Location: Regent University Library Auditorium

Note:
This certificate is available for continuing education units (CEUs) and is not available for academic credit.

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PLC014 Ethical Decision-Making Beyond the Rules of Professional Conduct

 

New Section:
October 9, 2014

This workshop will help participants understand the relationship between the Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the development of practical judgment. Course instructors will discuss areas in which the Rules allow lawyers to exercise discretion, and instructors will then discuss decision-making principles on how best to exercise that discretion. Read more below...

CLEs Available 1

Workshop Description:

This workshop will help participants understand the relationship between the Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the development of practical judgment. Course instructors will discuss both the areas in which the Rules allow lawyers to exercise discretion and decision-making principles for how to best exercise that discretion. Instructors will show case illustrations to help participants identify ethical scenarios that highlight the use of discretion and to understand the options for resolving such scenarios. Emphasis will be on the importance of authenticity and self-awareness as precursors to making ethical decisions that reflect personal integrity and promote emotional well-being.

Who Should Attend:

Lawyers, judges and other legal professionals

Educational Objectives:

  • This course is designed to help students:

    1. Explain how the Rules of Professional Conduct are limited in scope and how they acknowledge the importance of practical judgment in ethical decision-making.
    2. List professional and personal values the participant will seek to uphold in his or her ethical decision-making.
    3. Identify typical scenarios in which lawyers must exercise practical judgment to resolve ethical dilemmas.
    4. Describe specific techniques for how best to employ practical judgment to resolve ethical dilemmas in a manner consistent with the participant’s professional and personal values.

 

Learning Objectives:

After participating in this course, students will be able to:

  1. Exercise their discretion and good judgment in ethical decision-making with confidence
  2. Identify and apply professional and personal values at the workplace
  3. Act consistently in applying their values to their decision-making
  4. Enhance the legal profession as a whole by demonstrating better decision-making skills

CLEs

CLEs Available = 1

Price for Workshop:

Price: $29

Program Schedule:

  • PLC014 Ethical Decision-Making Beyond the Rules of Professional Conduct
    October 9, 2014 | 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. | Regent University Library Auditorium

Relevant References:

  • Regent Law School recently established a Center for Ethical Formation and Legal Education Reform, in part to recognize the law school’s innovation and progress in the areas of teaching, research and curricular design related to legal ethics and professionalism. The law school's mission includes teaching students not only the legal principles and skills important to the practice of law but also the character traits and values important to legal professionals. Participants taking the course at Regent will thus be able to drawn upon the expertise of Regent Law School, and particularly the course instructors, who serve as co-directors of the Center for Ethical Formation and have conducted extensive research in the area of professionalism and ethical decision-making.

Instructors:

Natt Gantt

Natt Ganntt, II

L. O. Natt Gantt, II, is Professor and Director of Academic Success and Advising and Co-Director, Center for Ethical Formation and Legal Education Reform. Professor Gantt received his A.B. in psychology and political science, summa cum laude, from Duke University; his Juris Doctor, cum laude, from Harvard Law School; and his Master of Divinity, summa cum laude, from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. Before joining Regent in 2000, he served as a law clerk to the late Honorable Donald S. Russell of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit; as an associate at Wiley, Rein & Fielding in Washington, D.C.; and as a Proxy Analyst at Fidelity Investments in Boston, Massachusetts. Professor Gantt teaches Professional Responsibility and directs Regent's Academic Success Program. Professor Gantt has been active in the national academic support community and served from 2004 to 2007 as editor of The Learning Curve, the newsletter of the Academic Support Section of the Association of American Law Schools. He also has been a faculty member of the Virginia State Bar Carrico Professionalism Course. He has spoken on various topics related to legal education and legal ethics and has authored several articles on those topics

 

Ben MadisonBen Madison

Professor Madison is Professor and Co-Director, Center for Ethical Formation and Legal Education Reform. He received his B.A. from Randolph-Macon College, and his M.A. (English) and JD from the College of William & Mary. Professor Madison teaches Civil Procedure and Pretrial Practice and Procedure. His pretrial practice casebook, Civil Procedure for All States: A Context and Practice Casebook (2010), has drawn praise as one of the first casebooks designed according to the recommendations of the Carnegie Institute in its groundbreaking work, Educating Lawyers (2007).  Educating Tomorrow’s Lawyers, an initiative of the Institute for the Advancement of the Legal Profession, elected Professor Madison a Fellow as a result of his casebook and efforts to improve legal education.  Along with Professor Gantt, Professor Madison was also selected to be a contributing author in the forthcoming Building on Best Practices in Legal Education, a book that evaluates methods to implement the recommendations of the Carnegie study. 
In addition to the casebook and forthcoming Building on Best Practice in Legal Education, Professor Madison has written and continues to write articles on improving legal education.  As a former litigation partner in the law firm of Hunton & Williams, a past bar association president, a long-time member of the James-Kent Inn of Court, and someone who in practice devoted thousands of hours to pro bono cases, Professor Madison brings his diverse experience into both teaching and, in particular, into his exploration with students of the scenarios that test lawyers’ ethical values and-he believes-determine the degree to which they find satisfaction in the legal field.