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Center for Global Justice

Center for Renewal Studies

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Areas of Focus

Make a donationEnding the abuse of human rights is a daunting undertaking. To fulfill its charge in the School of Law, the Center for Global Justice, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law has narrowed its work to five areas of focus.

Areas 1 and 2

Building a house without a foundation is foolish. Yet the international human rights movement has done just that. Although it has accomplished many great things, the movement has been seriously ineffective in protecting basic human rights because it has (1) failed to answer the foundational question, “where do human rights come from”? and (2) focus on the key to protecting human rights: the rule of law. Accordingly, the Center for Global Justice, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law seeks to advance human rights through two foundational ways: (1) advancing a natural law foundation for human rights and (2) advancing the rule of law.

(1) Advancing a Natural Law Foundation for Human Rights

From the beginning of the human rights movement post World War II, the international community has grappled with the underlying question, “where do human rights come from”? How can we affirmatively state that Nazi Germany was wrong to exterminate the Jews? Although various theories have been offered, the international community has agreed on none, and instead marched forward in building the house without ever providing a foundation. The Center for Global Justice is seeking to provide this answer by anchoring rights in natural law and biblical truth.

(2) Advancing the Rule of Law

Beyond answering the question, “where do human rights come from,” the human rights movement has also neglected the primary means of protecting human rights: the rule of law. The rule of law is the principle that the law, and not men, govern. When the laws on the books are actually enforced, justice for all is possible.  Rather than focusing on enforcing “core” human rights through the rule of law, however, the international human rights movement has focused on creating new, additional “human rights.” By adding new “rights” without first ensuring that core rights are enforced through the rule of law, the international human rights movement has undermined its very objective. The Center for Global Justice is committed to ensuring that basic rights, like the right to life, due process, liberty, and property (yes, property) are enforced through the rule of law. 

Areas 3, 4 and 5

Building from a natural law foundation for human rights and the rule of law, we focus on protecting three core human rights issues (i.e., building the frame of the house): (3) human trafficking, (4) protecting children, and (5) religious freedom abroad.

(3) Combating Human Trafficking

Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery and violates the most basic rights to life, liberty, and even property.

(4) Protecting Children

Children, particularly the unborn, are some of the most vulnerable and abused people in our world today. Whether children are abused, orphaned, sacrificed, or aborted, we must protect them.

(5) Securing Religious Freedom Abroad

Religious freedom is quickly becoming a forgotten right. But evidence shows that where religious freedom is threatened, other rights quickly disappear as well. Moreover, religious freedom is at the core of what it means to be human.