FROM THE EDITOR
Corné J. Bekker

Greetings! Welcome to the 2013 edition of the Journal of Biblical Perspectives in Leadership. Eight years ago when we started the journal, we sensed that a new avenue of scholarly research was emerging in the field of organizational leadership studies. This emerging stream of literature took the metaphors, models, approaches, truths, and principles of leadership in the Hebrew and Christian scriptures seriously and sought to use the insights of Biblical studies, theology, and organizational leadership to foster and advance this research. We have been grateful to see JBPL playing a central role in the growth of this scholarly enquiry. Special thanks go to Dr. Bruce Winston for his tiresome support of the journal. more

  BUILDING ORGANIZATIONS LIKE JESUS DID
Kay M. Bower

This essay seeks to explore building of the Christian community, exemplified by Jesus’ interactions with the disciples on the road to Emmaus, as a model for strategic leadership and the promise this model holds for twenty-first century organizations and leaders. Leadership strategy, as explored in this essay, will demonstrate how organizations can use Christ’s example to help make the “leap” from knowledge to understanding, to value service and honoring as basic tenets of the organizational culture, and to invest in people as a foundational element of the organization. more

   
LEADERSHIP FOR THE BODY OF CHRIST: DEVELOPING A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK OF SPIRITUAL LEADERSHIP FROM 1 TIMOTHY 3:1-7 AND TITUS 1:6-9: IDENTIFICATION AND EXPLANATION OF A SPIRITUAL LEADER’S PERSONAL PRIORITIES, FIDELITY OF AUTHORITY, AND COMMUNITY RESPONSIBILITY
Stephen M. King

The purpose of this article is to provide a conceptual framework for re-examining spiritual leadership. The article uses textual analysis, critically examining the meaning and consequences of Biblical leadership qualities or traits found in 1 Timothy 3:1-7 and Titus 1:6-9. The conceptual framework developed consists of three factors relevant to the socialization of spiritual leadership: personal priorities, fidelity of authority, and community responsibility. Using the Pauline texts as the basis for analysis, drawing upon relevant leadership literature, and illustrating with Biblical vignettes of spiritual leaders, the article contends that spiritual leadership is: (1) based on the character of Jesus Christ; (2) that the Pauline discussion of leadership characteristics found in 1 Timothy and Titus form the basis for spiritual leadership conceptualization and empirical development; and (3) that spiritual leadership should not be considered only in the context of a church vocation or function, such as pastor or elder, but is representative in all other vocational and professional walks of life. In addition, the article argues that as spiritual leadership is absent of one or more of these factors—character, authority, and community—there arises a breach or crisis in spiritual leadership, which has devastating social and cultural consequences. Spiritual leadership is a key variable in the study and re-examination of Biblically-based and Biblically-inspired theories of leadership. download/print article

   
A NARRATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE JERUSALEM COUNCIL DISCOURSES: TABLE FELLOWSHIP AND THE IMPLICIT THEOLOGY OF SALVATION
Michael Mahan
This study undertakes a narrative reading of the text of Acts 15:1-31 and develops the construct of implicit theology, defining it as generic, usually unspoken ideas about the theological realm that have a measurable effect on individual and congregational behavior. The reading of the Jerusalem council narrative (Acts 15:1-31) highlights three points of view regarding law, grace, and fellowship considerations. This study finds that one chief thread of the narrative is the issue of the practical matter of fellowship between Gentiles and law-following Jewish Christians. The practical issues in the narrative reveal the main narrative thread of the contrast of differing perspectives on the theology of salvation. Based on the council narrative, it is suggested that in applied settings, the implicit theology of salvation is a balance between grace and law rather than a dichotomous, theological position. This study proposes the development of instruments measuring implicit theology in congregational studies, potentially revealing implicit theological tenets underlying observable congregational characteristics. download/print article
   
“THIS IS HOW ONE SHOULD REGARD US”: AN EXEGETICAL STUDY ON PAUL’S TREATISE TO THE CORINTHIANS REGARDING HIS RELATIONAL EXPECTATIONS WITH HIS SPIRITUAL CHILDREN (1 CORINTHIANS 4:1-21)
Mary Jo Burchard
Much church conflict could be mitigated if both the ecclesial leaders and congregational members were in agreement about role expectations and behavioral norms within their group. This study explores Paul’s expectations for leaders and followers as described to the Corinthians in 1 Corinthians 4:1-21. A synchronic hermeneutical approach is utilized, which incorporates elements of historical and social-identity perspectives into the examination of the argumentative and sensory–aesthetic textures of socio-rhetorical inner-textual analysis. Findings include expectations for (a) a steward, (b) apostles, (c) a father, and (d) the congregation. The study also includes discussion and recommendations for further research, including a comparison of ecclesial leaders’ selection criteria in contemporary settings with those found in Pauline settings, and development of a means to identify how many ecclesial leaders in formal positions of authority are functioning as spiritual parents within their respective congregation(s). download/print article
   
THE ROLE OF THE ECCLESIAL LEADERS IN SHAPING THE FUTURE CHURCH
Tonya Banks
Through Biblical imagery or metaphor, the church is described as a social institution, and like all other organizations, has a purpose in achieving its vision, mission, values, goals, and beliefs. The church’s purpose is met through the use of human beings, which is a complex system that is made up of several components that interrelate and interconnect with the other like parts of a human body. One part of the system cannot function without the other. The role of the future leader is to know this complex system and how it must function in the future to progress forward. Leaders must challenge present organizational and leadership structures of faith communities with purpose for growth, change, and production in the church. The trend of culture, immigration, inculturation, migration, and mutuality are discussed. It is shown that systems theory can be applied within the church to achieve its mission in preparation for the future. download/print article
   
THE TRANSFORMATIONAL EFFECTS OF SABBATICAL IN LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
Christopher K. Turner and Douglas L. Fike
Christian leaders face stress and burnout in their professions. Taking a sabbatical is one way leaders can protect their personal growth to develop in their leadership, but as a recently emerging phenomenon, there is little understanding of the process, its dynamics, or categories. Drawing from a range of theoretical sources, this research proposes a model for building neutral space into the overall sabbatical process to hypothesize a difference in outcomes when participants intentionally disengage for a period of time from their normal ministry context. An exploratory multi-methodological approach is used to address the theoretical model of including a neutral zone in a sabbatical process by sequentially linking qualitative interviews with sabbatical participants and developing a survey instrument grounded in their experiences, opinions, and observations. Using exploratory factor analysis and comparing the mean differences between sabbatical participants who structured neutral space into their sabbatical experience, and those that did not, quantitative results support the hypotheses of the research. download/print article
   
THE CONSUMMATED HARVEST OF JESUS’ FOLLOWER-CENTRIC APPROACH IN THE LAST CHAPTER OF THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO JOHN
Peter K.Y. Chang
Jesus’ follower-centric approach confirmed that effective followership has substantial influence on successful leadership. Yet, he would not compel followers to comply with all his requests at once, but inspired them to do so when they devoted themselves heart and soul to his leading and teaching. This spontaneous confession of faith found an exemplar in the case of Simon Peter’s three-time denial and three-time repentance between Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection. Jesus made it possible for Simon Peter to change characteristics and reinstate apostleship. This study is grounded in Robbins’s inner-texture analysis in order to unfold Jesus’ attainment in the process of leader and followers’ reciprocal influences. Jesus’ follower-centric approach throughout his earthly mission, finally harvested tremendous success in the last chapter of the Gospel According to John. download/print article
   
LEADING BY BEING LED
Philip L. McKinney II
In Leading By Being Led, Phil McKinney II presents an exegetical examination of Biblical leadership as was demonstrated by two of scripture’s greatest leaders: Moses and Jesus. In particular, scripture points to how these two leaders demonstrated a leading from being led by God. God led both his nation and his church, and he continues to lead his people today. Biblical leadership is built upon following rather than taking the lead. This is a difficult path for most to take. It is human nature to want to take the lead and be in control. However, scripture demonstrates a leadership that is contrary to that of the world and human nature. In Leading By Being Led, readers discover the primary principles of leadership that rely on God’s guidance and direction rather than human will and initiative. This example of a “God who goes before us” is evidenced in five specific ways: (1) prophet, (2) presence (3) provisions, (4) prompting, and (5) passages. An examination of this “following the Father” is demonstrated through Moses and then paralleled in Jesus and is followed by an assessment of the implications for church leadership today. download/print article
   
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND SUCCESSION PLANNING: A BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE FOR AN ETHICAL RESPONSE
Thomas D. Hollinger
Succession planning and management (SP&M) is a critical process for the long-term viability of an organization. Replacement continuity and leadership development are both essential for the process to work effectively. In Apostle Paul’s epistles to Timothy and Titus, he established what might be considered the first formal SP&M program for the early church. Socio-rhetorical interpretation using intertexture, sacred texture, and social and cultural texture analysis reveals that experience, character, and appropriate capabilities established the basis for Christian leadership succession. Although contemporary SP&M applications have some similarities, they fail to generate the same level of moral scrutiny or dedicated effort, which places today’s organizations in a tenuous position. Going forward, organizations should consider the values and determination of the early church, placing more emphasis on SP&M—particularly on leadership development.
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The Journal of Biblical Perspectives in Leadership is a publication of the
Regent University School of Business &l Leadership | © 2013
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