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Dissertation Abstract

Chief Enrollment Manager Leadership Style and Enrollment Performance: A Correlation Study

Jeremy Dutschke
Regent University

Private colleges and universities are currently experiencing economic turbulence threatening their solvency and persistence. Since enrollment management is critical to the viability of these institutions, and Chief Enrollment Managers (CEMs) are integral in creating a private institution's enrollment management philosophy, strategy, and annual performance, this study explored CEM leadership style, as documented by the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, to explore any correlation between CEM transactional, transformational, or laissez-faire leadership style and institutional enrollment performance. Surprisingly, no statistically significant correlation was found between enrollment management divisions led by transactional CEMs and lower levels of institutional enrollment performance, except for only one positive, statistically significant correlation between CEM transactional leadership and Fall 1999 to Fall 2000 institutional enrollment performance. Likewise, this study found no statistically significant correlation between enrollment management divisions led by transformational CEMs and higher levels of institutional enrollment performance. Nor was there a statistically significant correlation found between enrollment management divisions led by laissez-faire CEMs and lower levels of institutional enrollment performance. In addition, no statistically significant difference was found between CEM self-rated transactional and transformational leadership and the subsequent CEM's scaled leadership as rated by their direct subordinates. Yet, a statistically significant difference was found between the CEM's self-rated laissez-faire leadership and the subsequent CEM's scaled leadership as rated by their direct subordinates. Specific limitations to the study and recommendations for future research were addressed.